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Tag Archives: Girl’s Sports

AMA says cheerleading should be designated a sport

The nation’s largest doctors’ group adopted that as policy this week at its annual meeting in Chicago. AMA members say cheerleading is as rigorous as many other activities that high schools and the NCAA consider sports. Adding it to the list would mean more safety measures for cheerleaders and proper training for their coaches.

Cheerleading is a leading cause of catastrophic injury in female athletes at the high school and college level, Dr. Samantha Rosman, a Boston-area pediatrician, told AMA delegates during floor debate before the vote.

“These girls are flipping 10, 20 feet in the air,” Rosman said. “We need to stand up for what is right for our patients and demand they get the same protection as their football colleagues.”

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Concussion Concerns Among Soccer Players

As World Cup fever sets in, local doctors say soccer is the second most dangerous sport for concussions.

It’s a traumatic brain injury, it’s a mild traumatic brain injury but nonetheless there is damage and the brain remembers that damage and the damage will always be there.”

Dr. Jeffery Royce says many parents and athletes don’t realize the long term effects of multiple concussions. That’s why he started the concussion care center at Swedes two years ago.

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Florida High School Athletic Association Mandates Helmets for Girls’ Lacrosse

Matanzas junior Bailee Hurd sat out two varsity lacrosse games in 2014, sidelined with a concussion she suffered during a chippy midseason contest against Buchholz. Flagler Palm Coast coach James Hackett says he hasn’t witnessed a player sustain a concussion in his three years at the Bulldogs’ helm.

Both are against the June 10 FHSAA ruling mandating the wearing of helmets in girls lacrosse starting in 2015. The decision was made after the Board weighed sport-specific injury data provided by Orange County, public testimony and a presentation by US Lacrosse, a national body that governs the sport at the preps level, FHSAA spokesperson Corey Sobers said.

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Pennsylvania school bans heading in soccer over concussion concerns

As President Barack Obama held a summit on the dangers of concussions, particularly in youth sports, a Pennsylvania school made the momentous decision to ban heading by its young soccer players.

In coordination with leading experts in the field, Bryn Mawr (Pa.) Shipley School administrators made the decision to outlaw a practice that has long been a staple of the most popular sport in the world, citing an increased amount of evidence that shows repeated heading of a soccer ball can cause lasting effects.

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Soccer headers leading to concussion

Three weeks ago, Scottsdale’s Julia Taffuri took a ball to the face while competing in Southern California with her Sereno Soccer Club team. After being knocked to the ground, she popped back up, dusted herself off and finished the half.

When she returned to the sideline, however, she started repeating herself and asking unlikely questions, including, “Where are we?” Her coaches immediately pulled her from the game, fearing what was confirmed later that day in a hospital: She had suffered a concussion.

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Concussion Rates Double Among High School Athletes

The rate of concussions in U.S. high school athletes more than doubled between 2005 and 2012, new research shows.

The trend probably reflects an increased awareness and more legislation governing concussions in student athletes, and not more danger in sports, the study authors noted.

“The bottom line is that rates have gone up,” said lead researcher Dr. Joseph Rosenthal, an assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Ohio State University. “We don’t know the exact reason. This was an observational study, so I can’t say for sure, but I believe what is explaining the increase is the increased awareness, not that sports are more dangerous. It’s just that the concussions are being recognized more, which is good news.”

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Obama plans conference on youth sports concussions

President Barack Obama, who has said he would “have to think long and hard” before letting a son play football because of the risk of head injuries, is planning a summit this month on youth sports safety and concussions.

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Parents, Student Athletes & Concussions

Any youth coach in Tennessee or Georgia who does not make parents sign a concussion form is breaking state law.
That goes for all sports, all ages, public or private, as long as the team collects any sort of fee.

The new law has been in place since January. But Channel 3 has learned some local coaches have been slow to adapt.
Some area schools are also getting involved by requiring all students or parents to sign the form, even if the child does not play a sport.

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High school sports: Concussion bill voted down in Oklahoma House

A bill to reform concussion management and treatment at the high school and youth sports levels was defeated by the state House of Representatives on Tuesday, despite earlier passing through the state Senate with ease and gaining headway in a House committee.

 Senate Bill 1790 was voted down on the House floor by a count of 45-39. It had previously cleared the House’s Common Education Committee by a vote of 16-1.

Illinois House Passes Bill Requiring Concussion Testing For High School Coaches

A bill requiring all Illinois high school sports coaches to take an online certification course on concussions is another step closer to becoming state law.

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