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Tag Archives: Girl’s Sports

Sports Safety and Brain Injuries: Subcommittee Examines Efforts to Improve Sports Safety

A House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee examined the issue of improving sports safety from brain injuries. Panelists testified on the efforts of youth and professional sports leagues to enhance player safety.

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High school athletes often playing with concussions

More than half of high school athletes with concussions play despite their symptoms, and often their coaches aren’t aware of the injury, according to a new study.

Most U.S. states have passed laws intended to prevent high school athletes from having a concussion go unrecognized and risking further danger by continuing to play, but legislation may not be enough, the researchers say.

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Sochi 2014: Cheshire looked like a ‘rag doll’ after concussion crash

British freestyle skier Rowan Cheshire has described the crash which ruled her out of the Sochi Winter Olympics as the “worst” of her career.

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Do dangers of concussion among youth outweigh benefits of sports?

Sports-related brain injuries are a hot topic these days. There are the headline-grabbing reports of professional athletes like Barnaby whose careers were sidelined by concussion. There is the ever-growing list of retired football and hockey players who have been diagnosed post-mortem — often post-suicide — with the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), allegedly brought on by repetitive head trauma. And then there are the parents’-worst-nightmare stories, like that of Damon Janes, the 16-year-old high school running back from Brocton, N.Y., who lost consciousness after an apparent helmet-to-helmet collision during a game this past September and died in the hospital soon afterward.

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Soccer ‘headers’ and concussions: Riskier than we thought?

Soccer players have always been assured that heading the ball — redirecting it by having it bounce off the head — is harmless when done correctly.

But brain researchers say the practice needs to be studied more to determine it’s a true risk for concussion.

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Does Your Kid Have a Concussion? Tips for Parents

A concussion is an invisible injury that can not be seen by MRI, CAT scan or X-rays. A concussion can affect the way a person thinks, feels and remembers things. Someone with a concussion can be sensitive to loud and repetitive noises and bright noises. It can make a person sleepy, emotional, distracted, moody and forgetful and it can be caused by a hit to the head or whiplash or anything that causes a sharp jarring to the head.

Because it can’t be diagnosed by X-ray, doctors diagnose it by asking questions and getting patients to do simple physical activities — my son had to touch his nose and then touch the doctor’s hand over and over.

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Concussion research advocate: NFL needs to “evolve” to protect players

One of the leading advocates for concussion research in athletes said he thinks the NFL needs to set new rules to protect players from traumatic brain injuries.

“Football is a constantly evolving game, we’re asking it to evolve again,” Chris Nowinski said in an interview with CBS News.

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NFL pushing legislation to overhaul concussion protocol for youth sports

Legislation for federal funding to help protect student athletes from concussions got the National Football League’s backing Monday in the shadow of the stadium where the Super Bowl will be played this weekend.

NFL Senior Vice President Adolpho Birch joined two New Jersey lawmakers in support of legislation drafted following the 2008 death of a New Jersey high school football player.

The proposal by Sen. Robert Menendez and Rep. Bill Pascrell involves national concussion guidelines currently under development for schools and youth sport programs by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The legislation would authorize a 5-year grant program to bring those guidelines to school sports programs nationwide.

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Scientists unveil pitch count for head injury prevention

Doctors focused on lowering risk of sports concussions and long-term head injuries introduced Hit Count, a data-driven personal analysis platform backed by Dr. Chris Nowinski of Sports Legacy Institute.

Hit Count was designed to establish guidelines for help parents and coaches regulate the allowance of brain trauma in children.

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Concussions Common in Middle School Girls Playing Soccer: Study

Girls who play soccer in middle school are vulnerable to concussions, new research shows.

And despite medical advice to the contrary, many play through their injury, increasing the risk of a second concussion, the study found.

Although awareness has increased about sports concussions, little research has been done on middle school athletes, especially girls, noted study co-author Dr. Melissa Schiff, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle.
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