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Tag Archives: Girl’s Sports

Sports are for Everyone program gets support from U.S. Navy

The hard-working, fun-loving people who run Sports Are for Everyone (SAFE), a nonprofit program for children with challenges, will now have volunteer support from the U.S. Navy.

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Brain injuries like Michael Schumacher’s can destroy lives: Study

People with severe head injuries like the one that left Michael Schumacher in critical condition have permanently altered brains that make the victims more likely to become mentally ill and die prematurely, scientists said on Wednesday.

Brain experts said most health services fail to make the link between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and long-term mental consequences, meaning patients can fall through the net into depression, behavioural problems and crime. While Schumacher, a wealthy and famous former motor-racing driver well supported by family, friends and doctors, is in a far better position that most with TBI, he will nevertheless still have a changed brain and will need to readjust and cope.

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Four More Studies Find Causal Links Between CTE and Contact Sports and Suicide Scientifically Premature

Four new scientific papers are adding to the growing chorus of researchers pouring cold water on the now common assumption in the media and general population that contact sports causes CTE, and that CTE causes those with the disease to commit suicide.

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W.Va. board approves sports concussions policy

The state Board of Education on Wednesday approved new rules on how high schools handle sports concussions, including requiring that a licensed health care professional clear athletes to return to action.

Last year, legislators passed a law requiring the Secondary School Activities Commission to draft regulations aimed at preventing youth concussions. Among other things, they require schools to increase awareness and warn players of the risks of continuing to play after they suffer a concussion.

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Teen Concussion Patients Should Lay Off Homework, Social Media, and Video Games

Teens who play high school sports like football that sustain a concussion should avoid texting, homework, and playing video games, according to new research coming out of Boston Children’s Hospital.

Researchers say that teen athletes that have suffered a concussion while playing a sport recovered faster when they practiced “cognitive rest.”

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NIH and NFL team up to take on Concussion Research

The U.S. National Institutes of Health is teaming up with the National Football League on research into the long-term effects of repeated head injuries and improving concussion diagnosis.

The projects will be supported largely through a $30 million donation made last year to the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health by the NFL, which is wrestling with the issue of concussions and their impact on current and former players.

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Four States Enact New Youth Concussion Laws In 2014

In at least four states, the turn of the calendar to 2014 means new laws to better protect young athletes from the dangers of concussions and sport-related brain injuries. That means 49 states now have youth concussion laws in effect, with Mississippi the only holdout.

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Extensive study on concussions in youth sports finds ‘culture of resistance’ for self-reporting injury

Young athletes in the U.S. face a “culture of resistance” to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. The report provides a broad examination of concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged 5 to 21. Overall, reported concussions rates are more frequent among high school athletes than college athletes in some sports — including football, men’s lacrosse and soccer, and baseball; higher for competition than practice (except for cheerleading); and highest in football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, soccer, and women’s basketball. Concussion rates also appear higher for youths with a history of prior concussions and among female athletes.

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Head injuries in one football season cause measurable brain damage

For college athletes who get through their sport’s season concussion-free, new research suggests it may be too early to breathe a sigh of relief.

Following a season of grueling practices and hard-fought games, football and ice hockey players who had no outward sign of head trauma showed worrisome changes in brain structure and cognitive performance that weren’t shared by athletes who competed in varsity sports such as track, crew and cross-country skiing, according to a report published Wednesday in the journal Neurology.

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Protect Your Child From Concussions In Sports

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.6 to 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries, such as concussions, occur each year. Most concussions go undiagnosed and untreated, which increases the risk of serious long-term effects in athletes. In light of the media’s recent attention on the NFL and NHL players’ lawsuits, parents might understandably be concerned for the safety of their children. Parents can protect their children by recognizing the signs of a concussion and following a few helpful tips.

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