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Tag Archives: Helmets

Tony Dorsett Is Losing His Mind

It was January 3, 1983, the last day of the NFL’s strike-shortened season, and Tony Dorsett’s Dallas Cowboys were losing to the Minnesota Vikings onMonday Night Football. A fumbled punt had the Cowboys trapped deep in their own territory, the ball a few inches outside the end zone.

And the Cowboys were out-manned. Fullback Ron Springs didn’t hear what play they were going to run, so he was still on the sideline, leaving only 10Cowboys on the field and Dorsett all alone in the backfield.

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NOCSAE Approves Development of First Football Helmet Standard to Address Concussions

The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) board of directors has approved the development of a revised football helmet standard that will require helmets to limit certain concussion causing forces.

The NOCSAE action to move forward the development of a more comprehensive helmet standard was taken on the heels of new NOCSAE-funded research which identified brain tissue response from a concussive event and the development of a new method to test helmets which replicates some of the rotational forces involved in a concussion. NOCSAE’s helmet standards have eliminated skull fractures in football by requiring the advancement of new helmet technology. This revised standard aims at continuing this advancement by attempting to reduce concussion risk.

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Does Your Kid Have a Concussion? Tips for Parents

A concussion is an invisible injury that can not be seen by MRI, CAT scan or X-rays. A concussion can affect the way a person thinks, feels and remembers things. Someone with a concussion can be sensitive to loud and repetitive noises and bright noises. It can make a person sleepy, emotional, distracted, moody and forgetful and it can be caused by a hit to the head or whiplash or anything that causes a sharp jarring to the head.

Because it can’t be diagnosed by X-ray, doctors diagnose it by asking questions and getting patients to do simple physical activities — my son had to touch his nose and then touch the doctor’s hand over and over.

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What We’ve Learned From Two Years of Tracking NFL Concussions

When FRONTLINE started investigating the NFL’s concussion crisis in 2012, we ran into an early stumbling block. We wanted to know how many head injuries were taking place in the league each season. The trouble was, no major news organization was keeping count. With little to go off besides the NFL’s own numbers, we decided to try it ourselves.

For the past two seasons, FRONTLINE’s Concussion Watch project has been tracking which players have gone down with head injuries, and how long they sit out post-concussion. Over that time, more than 300 players have been added to the league’s official injury report because of a concussion. With Super Bowl XLVIII now over, here are five takeaways from the data:

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Concussions and Cold Weather: Do Plunging Temperatures Make Head Injuries More Likely?

Even with the decline in concussions, there were still 228 sustained in the 2013 preseason and regular season, slightly fewer than one per game. With the Super Bowl kicking off Sunday night, Dr. Andrew Naidech, M.D. of Neurology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, says no evidence has been found to suggest colder weather creates a higher risk for a concussion.

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Is Football Safe Enough for Kids? 40 Percent Say No

An NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll has discovered a startling statistic on public attitudes toward the number one sport in America.

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Poll: Support For High School Football, Despite Concussion Risks

An NPR poll finds that just 7 percent of Americans say concussion risks are too great to continue offering football as a high school sport. But 44 percent of those surveyed said equipment and safety need to be improved.

Making sure that children are active often means getting them interested in sports. But parents have to weigh the health risks of those sports, including hits that can cause concussions.

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Lions RB suing NFL, helmet maker over concussions

 Former Detroit Lions running back Jahvid Best is suing the NFL and helmet maker Riddell after concussion problems helped cut short his career.

The lawsuit was filed in Wayne County Circuit Court on Tuesday. It alleges the league has been aware of evidence of mild traumatic brain injuries and the risk for its players for years, but ”deliberately ignored and actively concealed” the information. It also accuses Riddell of making defective helmets and failing to inform the players of the long-term effects of concussions.

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Scientists unveil pitch count for head injury prevention

Doctors focused on lowering risk of sports concussions and long-term head injuries introduced Hit Count, a data-driven personal analysis platform backed by Dr. Chris Nowinski of Sports Legacy Institute.

Hit Count was designed to establish guidelines for help parents and coaches regulate the allowance of brain trauma in children.

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Sports and concussions: should we worry?

“It felt like my brain was floating on a cloud inside my head,” Nic Latham says, a former Denison student athlete who had to be excused from playing due to excessive head trauma from lacrosse.

For the amount of talk that goes into head injuries causing memory loss, the first concussion seems to stick in the brains of the affected like superglue.

Latham, the former midfielder and a face-off specialist who earned all-state honors as a junior in high school, continues, “It was April 30, 2011. I was knocked out for 10-15 seconds or so and then was very dizzy. Once the adrenaline came down from playing, I got a pretty bad headache and whiplash to the point where I couldn’t move my neck for a week.”

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