Google+
Home / Tag Archives: Helmets (page 7)

Tag Archives: Helmets

Do Brand Name Helmets Offer Better Protection Against Concussion?

If you read the marketing material printed on some popular sports helmets, you’d most likely get the impression that scientific research proves these particular helmets will provide your child better protection against sports-related concussions (SRC). Not necessarily so says Dr.Alison Brooks, with the University of Wisconsin.

Brooks and her team reviewed three helmet brands used during the 2012 football season.

Read more:

After the Crash: A Closer Look at the Rising Incidence of Brain Injury

The rewards of risk are fueling a catastrophic increase in TBIs. How can we protect ourselves?

Read more:

Head Injuries in Mind, RMU Survey Shows Strong Support for Ban on Youth Contact Football

More than 40 percent of Americans support a ban on youth playing contact football up until entering high school, according to a survey of 1,003 adults by the Robert Morris University Polling Institute Powered by Trib Total Media.

Given studies showing “adult-sized impacts” that youth as young as seven years old are receiving, a significant percent of Americans, 40.5 percent, support a ban on youth playing contact football. Another 48.4 percent were opposed to such a ban and 11.1 percent were unsure. Among only those with an opinion – support for a ban prior to entering high school was 45.5 percent compared to 54.5 percent opposed.

Read more: 

Video: PBS NEWSHOUR; Will changing the sports culture reduce youth concussions?

While pro football has begun to confront the consequences of concussions, a new report is putting the spotlight on younger athletes and the risk they face from repeated head injuries. Jeffrey Brown talks to Dr. Robert Graham of The George Washington University, former NFL player Fred McCrary and athletic trainer Tamara McLeod.

View video:

More studies urged on concussions in young athletes

Is peewee football too early to wonder about concussions? Maybe not: A major report says far too little is known about the risks in youth sports, especially for athletes who suit up before high school.

And it’s not just a question for football. The Institute of Medicine found no one knows how often the youngest athletes suffer concussions or which sports have the highest rates. Nor is it clear if better headgear ever will help.

Read more:

Riddell doubling down on concussion data

After waves of lawsuits alleging the failure to warn about the dangers of the sport and that helmets were ineffective in preventing concussions, the number of companies making them dropped from more than a dozen in the late 1970s to only a couple of major names by the early 1990s.

The moral of the story: The football helmet business is risky, and it’s not easy for any company to stay on its feet.

Read more: