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Tag Archives: High School Athletics

“Targeting” Defined in High School Football in Effort to Reduce Risk of Injury

In an effort to reduce contact above the shoulders and lessen the risk of injury in high school football, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Football Rules Committee developed a definition for “targeting,” which will be penalized as illegal personal contact.

The definition of targeting and its related penalty were two of 10 rules changes approved by the rules committee at its January 24-26 meeting in Indianapolis. All rules changes were subsequently approved by the NFHS Board of Directors.

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Do dangers of concussion among youth outweigh benefits of sports?

Sports-related brain injuries are a hot topic these days. There are the headline-grabbing reports of professional athletes like Barnaby whose careers were sidelined by concussion. There is the ever-growing list of retired football and hockey players who have been diagnosed post-mortem — often post-suicide — with the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), allegedly brought on by repetitive head trauma. And then there are the parents’-worst-nightmare stories, like that of Damon Janes, the 16-year-old high school running back from Brocton, N.Y., who lost consciousness after an apparent helmet-to-helmet collision during a game this past September and died in the hospital soon afterward.

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Football Helmets Don’t Protect Side of Head From Blows in Tests

Players using current football helmets aren’t adequately protected against hits to the side of the head, which can lead to sometimes-lethal concussions and brain swelling, researchers said.

Ten helmets tested by researchers reduced the likelihood of traumatic brain injury by an average of 20 percent compared with no helmet in a simulation using crash test dummies. The most effective helmet reduced the risk by only 30 percent, according to data released today.

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New study on football helmet safety

They are the first line of defense in a violent sport but just how much protection do football helmets provide?

A new study reveals the ones currently used on the field may do little.

It’s been thought that helmets are better at protecting the skull than the brain.

Especially important for young athletes who’s brains are still developing. But so using new technology, these researchers put some popular helmets to the test, and here’s what they found.

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Rugby – Concussion risks in sport ignored – new study

Brain injuries are far too prevalent in sport, with many players ignoring warning signs of danger after a big knock, a new study has found.

Sport accounts for one in five traumatic brain injuries in New Zealand, with nearly half of those likely to have a high risk of complications.

Previous studies held sport accountable for about 15 per cent of head injuries but research published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport this month shows that to have increased to 21 per cent.

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Safely returning teens to sports after a concussion

Many parents wonder how soon after their child suffers a concussion is it safe to let their child play sports.

Doctors at the University at Buffalo may have discovered a testing process to safely allow athletes back in the game sooner. And along the way, they found some results that might scare some parents.

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Soccer ‘headers’ and concussions: Riskier than we thought?

Soccer players have always been assured that heading the ball — redirecting it by having it bounce off the head — is harmless when done correctly.

But brain researchers say the practice needs to be studied more to determine it’s a true risk for concussion.

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Does Your Kid Have a Concussion? Tips for Parents

A concussion is an invisible injury that can not be seen by MRI, CAT scan or X-rays. A concussion can affect the way a person thinks, feels and remembers things. Someone with a concussion can be sensitive to loud and repetitive noises and bright noises. It can make a person sleepy, emotional, distracted, moody and forgetful and it can be caused by a hit to the head or whiplash or anything that causes a sharp jarring to the head.

Because it can’t be diagnosed by X-ray, doctors diagnose it by asking questions and getting patients to do simple physical activities — my son had to touch his nose and then touch the doctor’s hand over and over.

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Lawmakers, Obama butt heads on football

President Obama said he wouldn’t let his son play pro football, but many lawmakers have a different perspective.

An avid pigskin fan, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) said he understands the risks.

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Concussions and Cold Weather: Do Plunging Temperatures Make Head Injuries More Likely?

Even with the decline in concussions, there were still 228 sustained in the 2013 preseason and regular season, slightly fewer than one per game. With the Super Bowl kicking off Sunday night, Dr. Andrew Naidech, M.D. of Neurology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, says no evidence has been found to suggest colder weather creates a higher risk for a concussion.

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