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Tag Archives: High School Athletics

NIH and NFL team up to take on Concussion Research

The U.S. National Institutes of Health is teaming up with the National Football League on research into the long-term effects of repeated head injuries and improving concussion diagnosis.

The projects will be supported largely through a $30 million donation made last year to the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health by the NFL, which is wrestling with the issue of concussions and their impact on current and former players.

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Concussion Identification, Evaluation and Management: A Step-By-Step Process

Management of sport-related concussion involves a step-by-step process say three recently issued concussion guidelines:

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Four States Enact New Youth Concussion Laws In 2014

In at least four states, the turn of the calendar to 2014 means new laws to better protect young athletes from the dangers of concussions and sport-related brain injuries. That means 49 states now have youth concussion laws in effect, with Mississippi the only holdout.

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The concussion doctor’s connections

Learn more about Dr. Robert C. Cantu’s relationships and connections.

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Football concussion lawsuits reach high school: Mississippi suit goes after NCAA and NFHS

Football concussion lawsuits have reached the high school game on a national scale.

A Mississippi father of a high school football player filed a class-action lawsuit this week against the NCAA and the National Federation of State High School Associations. The suit seeks to represent a class of all current high school football players in the United States as of December 2013.

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The concussion doctor’s tangled interests

He is America’s concussion doctor, a pioneer in the fight against sports-related brain damage. Dr. Robert C. Cantu is on call amid football’s concussion crisis: congressional hearings, courthouses, NFL meetings, helmet safety panels, operating rooms, research labs, television studios, film documentaries.

In the 45 years since he became a neurosurgeon in Boston, Cantu has become a fixture on the front lines of a public health campaign that is reshaping the way football in America is played.

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New helmet technology could help in spotting potential concussions

A hard hit rattles a football player’s helmet, prompting vibrations in an  athletic trainer’s pocket. If the trainer wasn’t already, he (or she) starts  watching the player for signs of a concussion.

The wireless alert system from helmet maker Riddell is one of several  technologies aimed at spotting potentially concussion-causing head impacts. But  getting players and parents to try them remains a challenge.

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Extensive study on concussions in youth sports finds ‘culture of resistance’ for self-reporting injury

Young athletes in the U.S. face a “culture of resistance” to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. The report provides a broad examination of concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged 5 to 21. Overall, reported concussions rates are more frequent among high school athletes than college athletes in some sports — including football, men’s lacrosse and soccer, and baseball; higher for competition than practice (except for cheerleading); and highest in football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, soccer, and women’s basketball. Concussion rates also appear higher for youths with a history of prior concussions and among female athletes.

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What a concussion looks like inside your brain

Concussions and traumatic brain injuries have been receiving national attention lately. Former football players reached a $765 million settlement against the NFL stemming from a lawsuit where they claimed to have memory loss, depression, headaches and dizziness after multiple head injuries during their careers. It’s not just athletes; the U.S. Department of Defense estimates that 22 percent of all combat injuries are traumatic brain injuries.

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Head injuries in one football season cause measurable brain damage

For college athletes who get through their sport’s season concussion-free, new research suggests it may be too early to breathe a sigh of relief.

Following a season of grueling practices and hard-fought games, football and ice hockey players who had no outward sign of head trauma showed worrisome changes in brain structure and cognitive performance that weren’t shared by athletes who competed in varsity sports such as track, crew and cross-country skiing, according to a report published Wednesday in the journal Neurology.

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