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Tag Archives: hockey

Heading off danger: Concussions and teens

It’s a hot July afternoon, just before a thunderstorm. The Bonnette family is in the living room next to a fan, discussing schedules. 17-year-old Giuliana Bonnette plays the right side position for the varsity volleyball team at Dominion High School in Sterling. She is now recovered from two concussions she suffered in the spring.

“It started out as just a really bad headache, and a little bit of confusion,” Bonnette said.

These were Giuliana Bonnette’s symptoms after her first concussion 6 months ago. Her head slammed against the ground during volleyball tryouts. It was first diagnosed as whiplash.

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School Sports: Five Myths About Concussions

Although most people have a general idea of what concussions are, there are still some myths surrounding the injury. 

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Should youth hockey rules change to prevent concussions?

Much of the conversation concerning kids and concussions has so far focused on football. Now the American Academy of Pediatrics says the number of dangerous injuries in youth ice hockey is on the rise, and the group is offering new recommendations that would change the way the sport is played.

According to USA Hockey, the governing body for youth hockey in the United States, more that 350,000 boys and girls lace up the skates in the U.S.  And for boys ages 13 and older, checking is a big part of the game.  

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Concussion Rates Double Among High School Athletes

The rate of concussions in U.S. high school athletes more than doubled between 2005 and 2012, new research shows.

The trend probably reflects an increased awareness and more legislation governing concussions in student athletes, and not more danger in sports, the study authors noted.

“The bottom line is that rates have gone up,” said lead researcher Dr. Joseph Rosenthal, an assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Ohio State University. “We don’t know the exact reason. This was an observational study, so I can’t say for sure, but I believe what is explaining the increase is the increased awareness, not that sports are more dangerous. It’s just that the concussions are being recognized more, which is good news.”

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More former NHL players sue over concussions

Another group of former NHL players has joined the fight for compensation for head injuries they say they incurred while playing, while at the same time targeting the violence of the game that they believe brought about those injuries.

Retired players Dave Christian, Reed Larson and William Bennett filed a class action lawsuit in federal court on Tuesday alleging that the league has promoted fighting and downplayed the risk of head injuries that come from it.

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Elevated Levels of Brain Injury Biomarkers in Concussion

Ice hockey players with sports-related concussion have elevations in the axonal injury biomarker total tau and the astroglial injury biomarker S-100 calcium-binding protein B, according to a study published online March 13 in JAMA Neurology.

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Football Helmets Don’t Protect Side of Head From Blows in Tests

Players using current football helmets aren’t adequately protected against hits to the side of the head, which can lead to sometimes-lethal concussions and brain swelling, researchers said.

Ten helmets tested by researchers reduced the likelihood of traumatic brain injury by an average of 20 percent compared with no helmet in a simulation using crash test dummies. The most effective helmet reduced the risk by only 30 percent, according to data released today.

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New study on football helmet safety

They are the first line of defense in a violent sport but just how much protection do football helmets provide?

A new study reveals the ones currently used on the field may do little.

It’s been thought that helmets are better at protecting the skull than the brain.

Especially important for young athletes who’s brains are still developing. But so using new technology, these researchers put some popular helmets to the test, and here’s what they found.

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Safely returning teens to sports after a concussion

Many parents wonder how soon after their child suffers a concussion is it safe to let their child play sports.

Doctors at the University at Buffalo may have discovered a testing process to safely allow athletes back in the game sooner. And along the way, they found some results that might scare some parents.

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Does Your Kid Have a Concussion? Tips for Parents

A concussion is an invisible injury that can not be seen by MRI, CAT scan or X-rays. A concussion can affect the way a person thinks, feels and remembers things. Someone with a concussion can be sensitive to loud and repetitive noises and bright noises. It can make a person sleepy, emotional, distracted, moody and forgetful and it can be caused by a hit to the head or whiplash or anything that causes a sharp jarring to the head.

Because it can’t be diagnosed by X-ray, doctors diagnose it by asking questions and getting patients to do simple physical activities — my son had to touch his nose and then touch the doctor’s hand over and over.

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