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Tag Archives: hockey

Concussion specialist may begin new era in Sochi

In another sign of the growing concern about head trauma in sports, the NHL and the U.S. ski team will each have at least one concussion expert at the Sochi Olympics.

Dr. Jeff Kutcher, a Michigan-based neurologist, will be in one of two hockey arenas and the on-hill physician for three events on the slopes in Russia.

U.S. ski team medical director Kyle Wilkens said Kutcher will be the association’s first specialist evaluating and treating concussions during the Winter Olympics.

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Scientists unveil pitch count for head injury prevention

Doctors focused on lowering risk of sports concussions and long-term head injuries introduced Hit Count, a data-driven personal analysis platform backed by Dr. Chris Nowinski of Sports Legacy Institute.

Hit Count was designed to establish guidelines for help parents and coaches regulate the allowance of brain trauma in children.

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NFL, NHL concussion cases are not the same

Three months after the NFL agreed on a $765 million settlement with thousands of ex-players for concussion-related health problems, a group of their NHL peers is going to court, too.

Hockey has proven to be an equally dangerous sport as football, but that doesn’t mean the link between collisions on the ice and post-career trouble will lead to a similar outcome. The legal and cultural surroundings of the NFL and NHL concussion lawsuits are more distinct than alike.

Start with the nature of the players themselves.

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Citing Costs, N.H.L. Injury Study Urges More Safety

An author of a new medical study said the high cost of paying injured N.H.L. players should push the league to stiffen what he described as inadequate measures to prevent brain trauma, including rules that still allow fighting.

“N.H.L. owners need to do a better job of protecting their athletes — if not for their players, then for their own pocketbooks,” said the author, Dr. Michael Cusimano, a neurosurgeon at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.

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Sports are for Everyone program gets support from U.S. Navy

The hard-working, fun-loving people who run Sports Are for Everyone (SAFE), a nonprofit program for children with challenges, will now have volunteer support from the U.S. Navy.

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A Hockey Safety Checklist for Your Kids

As a Responsible Sport Parent or Coach, what’s more important than teaching your kids the rules of hockey and lessons for life? Insuring their safety on the ice.

That’s why Responsible Sports and the experts at Positive Coaching Alliance have teamed up to create quick safety checklists for both youth sports parents and coaches.  Everything from weather, concussions, and ride homes are covered.

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Football Concussions Crisis Sparks Debate Over Helmet Ban

Football isn’t about to go away, of course. But some experts say football helmets should. They say helmets offer little protection and argue for a helmet-free version of the game. Other experts say helmets save lives, plain and simple.

What do you think? Should football helmets stay in the game—or be tossed out? Before tackling that question yourself, read what two leading experts have to say.

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The concussion doctor’s tangled interests

He is America’s concussion doctor, a pioneer in the fight against sports-related brain damage. Dr. Robert C. Cantu is on call amid football’s concussion crisis: congressional hearings, courthouses, NFL meetings, helmet safety panels, operating rooms, research labs, television studios, film documentaries.

In the 45 years since he became a neurosurgeon in Boston, Cantu has become a fixture on the front lines of a public health campaign that is reshaping the way football in America is played.

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Extensive study on concussions in youth sports finds ‘culture of resistance’ for self-reporting injury

Young athletes in the U.S. face a “culture of resistance” to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. The report provides a broad examination of concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged 5 to 21. Overall, reported concussions rates are more frequent among high school athletes than college athletes in some sports — including football, men’s lacrosse and soccer, and baseball; higher for competition than practice (except for cheerleading); and highest in football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, soccer, and women’s basketball. Concussion rates also appear higher for youths with a history of prior concussions and among female athletes.

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Protect Your Child From Concussions In Sports

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.6 to 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries, such as concussions, occur each year. Most concussions go undiagnosed and untreated, which increases the risk of serious long-term effects in athletes. In light of the media’s recent attention on the NFL and NHL players’ lawsuits, parents might understandably be concerned for the safety of their children. Parents can protect their children by recognizing the signs of a concussion and following a few helpful tips.

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