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Tag Archives: NCAA

Football concussions: Amid the fear, UGA research brings some hope

While most concussion research focuses on college and professional players or young children, a team of neuroscientists at the University of Georgia is tackling an often overlooked cohort of athletes.

The average Joes are middle-aged men who played football, but not in any kind of national spotlight. They suffered concussions during their glory days on the high school gridiron.

Each participant underwent an fMRI scan, which measures brain activity by detecting changes in blood flow within the brain. An image of the brain appears on the computer screen, and as the volunteer performs various mental tasks, different regions light up to different degrees, representing activity in those areas.

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College Players Often Don’t Tell of Hits to Head, Studies Find

The controversy over why Michigan quarterback Shane Morris was allowed to return to the field with a “probable mild concussion” from a violent hit last Saturday highlighted a communications breakdown on the Wolverines’ sideline. But it also pointed to the inconsistent ways in which coaches and players acknowledge hits to the head — if they acknowledge them at all.

Three studies published in the past few weeks have offered more insight into that issue, concluding that the self-reporting of concussions by college players varies by position, with offensive linemen the least likely to report concussions and less significant hits to the head.

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Virginia Tech participates in NCAA initiative to limit concussions among college athletes, military personnel

Virginia Tech is participating in a new, landmark $30 million national effort sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the U.S. Department of Defense to combat concussions among college athletes and active service military personnel.

The NCAA-U.S. Department of Defense initiative funds the most comprehensive study of concussion and head impact exposure ever conducted. It will enroll an estimated 25,000 male and female NCAA student-athletes during a three-year study period. Virginia Tech will focus on athletes participating in various sports, including football, women’s soccer, men’s soccer, and women’s lacrosse.

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Can helmets protect your kids from concussions like companies claim?

From Pop Warner to the pros, football players will soon strap on their helmets for another hard-hitting season on the gridiron. Those hard hits can be dangerous, even deadly. Helmet companies claim new products can protect your kids from concussions, but do they really work?

The big helmet-to-helmet hits send football fans to their feet. The problem is that the hits also send players to the hospital. The concussion discussion dominates safety speak at every level.

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Selecting a Concussion Educator: Robb Rehberg Thinks Athletic Trainers Best Suited For The Role

With youth sports concussion safety laws in place in all 50 states, increased public awareness about concussions, and growing concernabout the long-term effect of repetitive head impacts, the demand for concussion education, not just for parents, coaches, and athletes, but for health care professionals as well is at an all-time high, and promises to go even higher in the coming years.

But who should sports programs – whether school-based or independently run – hire to educate athletes, coaches, and parents about concussions? What kind of training, education and experience should they have?

We decided to ask a number of leading concussion educators.  First up is Robb Rehberg, Professor and Coordinator of Athletic Training Clinical Education at William Paterson University in Wayne, New Jersey.

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NCAA releases football hitting and concussion safety guidelines

The NCAA released Monday new guidelines for concussion safety, including limiting live contact football practices to two per week during the season.

The guidelines address contact at football practices, independent medical care for all athletes, and best practices to diagnose and manage concussions. The NCAA, which faces multiple concussion lawsuits, worked with the College Athletic Trainers’ Society, several medical organizations, multiple conferences and the American Football Coaches Association to create guidelines, not rules.

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Concussions From Football Practices — Not Just Games — Are Big Part Of Problem

 A lineman who plays in high school, college and the pros may retire with 10,0000 sub-concussive hits, none of which were diagnosed, none of which he is aware of. The aggregate of these hits produce brain damage much more severe than being knocked out three times.

Prominent neurologists and researchers like Robert Cantu, Julian Bailes, Kevin Guskiewicz, Kristen Willeumier and David Hovda report that three or more concussions may lead to exponentially higher rates of Alzheimer’s, ALS, dementia, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and depression. This is different from other injuries. Brain function provides memory, judgment, and personality — what it means to be a sentient human being. That is why we are forming a new foundation, “Athletes Speak,” with players advocating awareness and prevention.

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Medical College of Wisconsin Part of $30 Million Concussion Study

Researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin will be part of a major study on sports concussions.

President Obama announced the $30 million study Thursday along with the partnership between the NCAA and Department of Defense.

“We’ve got to have every parent, coach and teacher recognize the signs of concussions,” President Obama said.

Along with the University of Michigan and Indiana University School of Medicine, researches at the Medical College of Wisconsin will track 1,200 Division I NCAA athletes for three years using sensors and cutting-edge technology.

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Off Season May Not Be Long Enough to Recover From Football ‘Hits’

New research shows that the brains of some football players who had the usual head hits associated with the sport, but no concussions, still had signs of mild brain injury six months after the season ended.

“We followed athletes at the beginning of football season, after and for six months later,” said Dr. Jeffrey Bazarian, an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, in Rochester, N.Y.

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Study finds no link between years of football play and cognitive function in adolescent athletes

A new study presented today at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found no link between neurocognitive function and years of football play in adolescent athletes.

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