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Tag Archives: NCAA

Study Showing Helmet Design Can Reduce Concussion Risk Leaves Many Questions Unanswered

The design of football helmets can effect concussion risk, finds a new study by some of the nation’s top concussion researchers.

The study provides what the authors say is good clinical evidence that helmet design can lower the risk of concussion, not in a laboratory, but in games and practices, by showing that a helmet model introduced in 2000 provides better protection against concussion than an older helmet employing 20-year-old design technology. 

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Judge to hear arguments in Md. football death suit

A lawsuit stemming from the head-injury death of a Frostburg State University football player should be dismissed because his coaches did not know the athlete was bleeding or had suffered a concussion and could not have foreseen that he was endangering his life by participating in practice drills, lawyers say.

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NCAA concussion defense: Sporting event organizers aren’t liable for obvious injury risks

As ex athletes seek medical help and lawyers jockey for position and money in the lawsuits, the NCAA’s defense is crystalizing. The legal argument emerging is this: The NCAA has no legal duty to protect college athletes.

The NCAA was one of several defendants named in a wrongful death suit brought by the family of Frostburg State football player Derek Sheely, who died in 2011 after suffering a brain injury during preseason practice. The lawsuit in Maryland state court claims Frostburg State coaches kept berating Sheely to continue practicing even though he was bleeding profusely from his forehead after multiple hits to the head over several days of practices.

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Why the NCAA, not the NFL, is key to concussion debate

Today the concussion debate centers around the NFL and the numerous stories of players committing suicide or suffering form dementia and other brain-related illnesses. But the concussion problem is much bigger than the NFL.

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The concussion doctor’s connections

Learn more about Dr. Robert C. Cantu’s relationships and connections.

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Football concussion lawsuits reach high school: Mississippi suit goes after NCAA and NFHS

Football concussion lawsuits have reached the high school game on a national scale.

A Mississippi father of a high school football player filed a class-action lawsuit this week against the NCAA and the National Federation of State High School Associations. The suit seeks to represent a class of all current high school football players in the United States as of December 2013.

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The concussion doctor’s tangled interests

He is America’s concussion doctor, a pioneer in the fight against sports-related brain damage. Dr. Robert C. Cantu is on call amid football’s concussion crisis: congressional hearings, courthouses, NFL meetings, helmet safety panels, operating rooms, research labs, television studios, film documentaries.

In the 45 years since he became a neurosurgeon in Boston, Cantu has become a fixture on the front lines of a public health campaign that is reshaping the way football in America is played.

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Head injuries in one football season cause measurable brain damage

For college athletes who get through their sport’s season concussion-free, new research suggests it may be too early to breathe a sigh of relief.

Following a season of grueling practices and hard-fought games, football and ice hockey players who had no outward sign of head trauma showed worrisome changes in brain structure and cognitive performance that weren’t shared by athletes who competed in varsity sports such as track, crew and cross-country skiing, according to a report published Wednesday in the journal Neurology.

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It’s Not Just Football: Other college athletes are actually more likely to suffer concussions.

But as researchers and policy makers know, concussions aren’t only a danger in football—in fact, football isn’t even the sport in which they present the greatest risk, at least in terms of frequency.

Football may have the highest number of concussions by sport because of the roster size, but many other sports see higher occurrence rates per athletic exposure. According to a National Academy of Sciences report released last month, field hockey, lacrosse, soccer, wrestling, ice hockey, and basketball have all proved about as dangerous or more so than football in recent years.

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Bill cosponsors hope to get a handle on concussions

Rep. Joyce Beatty, D-Jefferson Township, and Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., are cosponsors of a bill that threatens to withhold federal funding from colleges and universities that do not work to protect their student-athletes. Yesterday, they invited lawmakers and Capitol Hill staff to an hourlong briefing on the issue of concussions in sports.

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