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Tag Archives: Neurocognitive testing

Concussion Symptoms Continue Long After Injury

Symptoms such as headache, dizziness and blurry vision typically show up right after a child suffers a concussion. In a study from the emergency medicine division at Boston Children’s Hospital, researchers have found that emotional and mental symptoms, such as irritability and frustration may show up much later and hang around longer.

 “Patients and their families should expect the physical symptoms that they experience after a head injury to get better over the next few weeks, but that emotional symptoms may come on later, even as the physical symptoms subside,” said lead researcher Dr. Matthew Eisenberg.

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Bringing Student Athletes Back From Concussions

Since 2011, the all-boys’ private school, generally known as St. Mike’s, has been running programs in partnership with the David L. MacIntosh Sport Medicine Clinic at the University of Toronto to support the recovery of student athletes who have sustained concussions, known medically as mild traumatic brain injuries.

The progressive programs, Return to Learn and Return to Play, are spearheaded by Barbara Csenge, the director of student enrichment at St. Mike’s, and Dr. Michael Hutchison, the director of the university clinic’s concussion program.

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Baseline Neurocognitive Testing in Sports-Related Concussions: the Importance of a Prior Night’s Sleep.

In completing baseline neurocognitive testing, it is particularly important that the athlete be alert, well-
rested and sleep adequately the night before testing. However, the role of sleep in the baseline testing
process has never been formally investigated. Therefore, the recent study by McClure et al. provides
very timely and important information. The abstract for this paper is presented below. We recommend the
full article to all ImPACT clients.

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HBO’s “REAL SPORTS” examines safety in the Professional Bull Riding

When “REAL SPORTS” first visited the PBR in 2009, the debate over requiring riders to wear helmets to help prevent concussions and other traumatic brain injuries was heating up. In January this year, correspondent Jon Frankel visited the 2014 BFTS season opener in New York City, which featured the world’s Top 35 bull riders. “REAL SPORTS” and its cameras captured a progressed PBR in which most of the top riders have traded in their cowboy hats for helmets and new riders are required to wear them.

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Sports Leagues, Athletes Talk Concussions with DC Lawmakers

The NFL joined representatives from the NHL and medical doctors to let Congress know how head injuries are impacting American athletes from junior programs to the pros, saying they are devising safer helmets to guard against the chances of players suffering concussions.

Jeffery Miller, Senior Vice President for Player Health and Safety Policy at the National Football League, testified in Washington that while “football has earned a vital place in the  rhythm of American life,” helmets for players have not caught up to what is necessary to protect players.

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Concussion controls are still lacking, say Lewis Moody and Rory Lamont

• Players can’t be trusted to be honest, says Lamont
• Moody adds that the OK should be in specialist hands

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NASCAR Media Roundtable: Forcing drivers to sit after a concussion

The long-term effects of head trauma in the NFL, along with other sports, are just now beginning to be realized. This year, NASCAR has mandated baseline cognitive testing for its drivers — a move applauded by some (Dale Earnhardt Jr.) and questioned by others (Brad Keselowski). The question to you: Is NASCAR opening a Pandora’s box? How will the sport enforce sitting a driver not cleared by doctors when championship and future sponsorship considerations are on the line? Can this objectively be accomplished?

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Does Your Kid Have a Concussion? Tips for Parents

A concussion is an invisible injury that can not be seen by MRI, CAT scan or X-rays. A concussion can affect the way a person thinks, feels and remembers things. Someone with a concussion can be sensitive to loud and repetitive noises and bright noises. It can make a person sleepy, emotional, distracted, moody and forgetful and it can be caused by a hit to the head or whiplash or anything that causes a sharp jarring to the head.

Because it can’t be diagnosed by X-ray, doctors diagnose it by asking questions and getting patients to do simple physical activities — my son had to touch his nose and then touch the doctor’s hand over and over.

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What We’ve Learned From Two Years of Tracking NFL Concussions

When FRONTLINE started investigating the NFL’s concussion crisis in 2012, we ran into an early stumbling block. We wanted to know how many head injuries were taking place in the league each season. The trouble was, no major news organization was keeping count. With little to go off besides the NFL’s own numbers, we decided to try it ourselves.

For the past two seasons, FRONTLINE’s Concussion Watch project has been tracking which players have gone down with head injuries, and how long they sit out post-concussion. Over that time, more than 300 players have been added to the league’s official injury report because of a concussion. With Super Bowl XLVIII now over, here are five takeaways from the data:

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Is Football Safe Enough for Kids? 40 Percent Say No

An NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll has discovered a startling statistic on public attitudes toward the number one sport in America.

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