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Tag Archives: NFHS

Why Are Women With Concussions Overlooked?

Female athletes face an even greater risk for head injuries than men do.

“Asking a concussed athlete if they can play is like asking a drunk driver if they can drive,” says Lauren Long, cofounder of Concussion Connection, an athlete support group. “If it’s left up to them, they’ll keep playing. That’s why you can’t leave decisions about a player’s health to the player. You need a doctor.”

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Selecting a Concussion Educator: Robb Rehberg Thinks Athletic Trainers Best Suited For The Role

With youth sports concussion safety laws in place in all 50 states, increased public awareness about concussions, and growing concernabout the long-term effect of repetitive head impacts, the demand for concussion education, not just for parents, coaches, and athletes, but for health care professionals as well is at an all-time high, and promises to go even higher in the coming years.

But who should sports programs – whether school-based or independently run – hire to educate athletes, coaches, and parents about concussions? What kind of training, education and experience should they have?

We decided to ask a number of leading concussion educators.  First up is Robb Rehberg, Professor and Coordinator of Athletic Training Clinical Education at William Paterson University in Wayne, New Jersey.

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With high school football concussion cases rising, limits on contact at practice likely

Terry O’Neil unsuccessfully tried to steer the audience in an accurate direction.

The question from the former New Orleans Saints executive to those in the Palisades Ballroom in UCLA’s Carnesale Commons on Tuesday afternoon was, “How many concussions occurred on NFL practice fields last season?”

He began counting down from 400. The lower he went, the louder the audience voiced he was counting in the wrong direction. O’Neil appeased the disbelieving audience, asking about numbers as high as 600 before ending the exchange with a thud.

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Connecticut School Officials Welcome New Concussion Law

A state law that went into effect July 1, aimed at reducing the number of concussions in children, can prevent students from participating in athletics unless they receive information or complete training.

“An Act Concerning Youth Athletics and Concussions” was introduced by the Committee on Children. It requires the state Board of Education to work with the state’s Public Health Department to develop a “concussion education plan.” Local boards of education would then adopt the plan by using “written materials, online training or videos or in person training,” the bill states.

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Concussions From Football Practices — Not Just Games — Are Big Part Of Problem

 A lineman who plays in high school, college and the pros may retire with 10,0000 sub-concussive hits, none of which were diagnosed, none of which he is aware of. The aggregate of these hits produce brain damage much more severe than being knocked out three times.

Prominent neurologists and researchers like Robert Cantu, Julian Bailes, Kevin Guskiewicz, Kristen Willeumier and David Hovda report that three or more concussions may lead to exponentially higher rates of Alzheimer’s, ALS, dementia, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and depression. This is different from other injuries. Brain function provides memory, judgment, and personality — what it means to be a sentient human being. That is why we are forming a new foundation, “Athletes Speak,” with players advocating awareness and prevention.

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Concussions in Youth Sports Being Studied by the US Government

Brain injuries in youth sports have been on the rise in recent years, alarming many parents about the lifelong effects of concussions. The number of brain injuries linked to American youth increased 62 percent between the years of 2001 and 2009, with reported incidents around 250,000 in 2009 (Obama, NFL, NCAA Get Behind Research into Concussions in Youth Sports: Insurance Journal, May 29, 2014).

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AMA says cheerleading should be designated a sport

The nation’s largest doctors’ group adopted that as policy this week at its annual meeting in Chicago. AMA members say cheerleading is as rigorous as many other activities that high schools and the NCAA consider sports. Adding it to the list would mean more safety measures for cheerleaders and proper training for their coaches.

Cheerleading is a leading cause of catastrophic injury in female athletes at the high school and college level, Dr. Samantha Rosman, a Boston-area pediatrician, told AMA delegates during floor debate before the vote.

“These girls are flipping 10, 20 feet in the air,” Rosman said. “We need to stand up for what is right for our patients and demand they get the same protection as their football colleagues.”

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Concussion Rates Double Among High School Athletes

The rate of concussions in U.S. high school athletes more than doubled between 2005 and 2012, new research shows.

The trend probably reflects an increased awareness and more legislation governing concussions in student athletes, and not more danger in sports, the study authors noted.

“The bottom line is that rates have gone up,” said lead researcher Dr. Joseph Rosenthal, an assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Ohio State University. “We don’t know the exact reason. This was an observational study, so I can’t say for sure, but I believe what is explaining the increase is the increased awareness, not that sports are more dangerous. It’s just that the concussions are being recognized more, which is good news.”

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Study finds no link between years of football play and cognitive function in adolescent athletes

A new study presented today at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found no link between neurocognitive function and years of football play in adolescent athletes.

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High school athletes often playing with concussions

More than half of high school athletes with concussions play despite their symptoms, and often their coaches aren’t aware of the injury, according to a new study.

Most U.S. states have passed laws intended to prevent high school athletes from having a concussion go unrecognized and risking further danger by continuing to play, but legislation may not be enough, the researchers say.

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