Google+
Home / Tag Archives: Rugby (page 2)

Tag Archives: Rugby

Rugby coming round to concussion dangers

Five months after Rory Lamont, the former Scotland full-back, lifted the lid in an exclusive Scotsman interview on a culture within sport that treated concussion as a temporary, minor injury, rugby unions, leading sports medics, government officials and other sporting bodies have begun to accept that some of their practices in managing head injuries were inadequate.

Read more:

Player welfare demands the IRB reassesses its policy on concussion

The current medical protocols put in place by the International Rugby Board (IRB) generally, and at individual tournaments such as the Six Nations, have received trenchant criticism from experts such as Dr Barry O’Driscoll. Dr O’Driscoll, who once sat on the IRB’s medical committee, claims that current IRB concussion protocols are inadequate and endangering player welfare. Why, he argues, is the sport permitting players “with brain damage to be put back on the rugby field?”

At the first ever brain injury and European sport conference held in Dublin on 13 December last, the treatment of Dr O’Driscoll’s nephew, Brian, during the November international against the All-Blacks, was used as an example of the inadequacies of current IRB policy. O’Driscoll was taken from the field with suspected concussion but apparently passed the requisite concussion protocol.

Read more:

Protect Your Child From Concussions In Sports

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.6 to 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries, such as concussions, occur each year. Most concussions go undiagnosed and untreated, which increases the risk of serious long-term effects in athletes. In light of the media’s recent attention on the NFL and NHL players’ lawsuits, parents might understandably be concerned for the safety of their children. Parents can protect their children by recognizing the signs of a concussion and following a few helpful tips.

Read more:

Safety campaigners want to BAN children from heading footballs until their teens

Children should be ‘banned’ from heading footballs, according to a leading sports safety campaigner.

Former professional wrestler Chris Nowinski suffered from concussion due to numerous blows to the head when playing American football at college.

Read more:

CHILD SAFETY UPDATE: Protect Your Child From Concussions In Sports

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.6 to 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries, such as concussions, occur each year. Most concussions go undiagnosed and untreated, which increases the risk of serious long-term effects in athletes. In light of the media’s recent attention on the NFL and NHL players’ lawsuits, parents might understandably be concerned for the safety of their children. Parents can protect their children by recognizing the signs of a concussion and following a few helpful tips.

Read more:

New Guidelines Rule Out Same-Day Return to Play for Athletes with Concussion Updated Consensus Statement Includes New Concussion Recognition Tool, Reports Neurosurgery

Any athlete with concussion symptoms should not be allowed to return to play on the same day, according to the latest consensus statement on sports-related concussion. The updated guidelines are summarized in Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

The fourth consensus report from the Concussion in Sport Group (CISG 4) represents the latest recommendations from an expert panel, sponsored by five international sports governing bodies.

Read more:

Brain damage concussion fears seep into rugby and soccer

Rugby and soccer players who suffer multiple knocks to the head during their careers are at added risk of brain damage that could lead to dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases, brain scientists are warning.

Just as some American football players and boxers have been found to have long-term cognitive deficits after suffering repeated head blows or concussions during play, so soccer and rugby players must be made aware of the same dangers.

Read more:

Rugby death is first of its kind in Northern Ireland

The coroner at the hearing in Belfast said it was also “probably” the first such case in the UK. Ben Robinson, from Carrickfergus, County Antrim, died after suffering concussion during a school rugby match.

The syndrome happens when a blow causes swelling to the brain before it has recovered fully from an earlier injury.  The schoolboy was in several heavy tackles before collapsing near the end of the game in January 2011.

Read more:

Rugby and concussion: Are big hits bringing big headaches?

Under the previous IRB approach, any player suspected of suffering from concussion had to leave the pitch and take a week off, a period already reduced from three weeks under an earlier rule. The new guidelines say a player can return to the game just five minutes after the injury, providing a medical inspection clears him of concussion.

“For someone with suspected concussion, all the top scientists say you take them off and watch them that night,” says O’Driscoll, who played in the 1971 Five Nations Championship.

Read more:

Top doctors claim rugby authorities are ‘in denial’ over the dangers of concussion

Scientists researching the effect of concussion on the brain claim that rugby’s authorities are in a state of denial about the ‘almost incontrovertible’ evidence of a link between repeated  concussion and the development of degenerative conditions.

In a pioneering study, Dr Michael J Grey, reader in Motor Neuroscience at the University of Birmingham’s School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, and Tony Belli, a consultant neurosurgeon at the city’s Queen Elizabeth Hospital, are investigating the state of the brain after a concussion using cutting-edge technology funded by the British Medical Association and the National Institute for Health Research. 

Having already undertaken research into the effects of  traumatic brain injuries in sportsmen and women, they are alarmed by rugby’s refusal to admit that repeated concussion can lead to long-term brain damage.

Read more: