Google+
Home / Tag Archives: Second impact (page 7)

Tag Archives: Second impact

Sochi 2014: Cheshire looked like a ‘rag doll’ after concussion crash

British freestyle skier Rowan Cheshire has described the crash which ruled her out of the Sochi Winter Olympics as the “worst” of her career.

Read more

Do dangers of concussion among youth outweigh benefits of sports?

Sports-related brain injuries are a hot topic these days. There are the headline-grabbing reports of professional athletes like Barnaby whose careers were sidelined by concussion. There is the ever-growing list of retired football and hockey players who have been diagnosed post-mortem — often post-suicide — with the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), allegedly brought on by repetitive head trauma. And then there are the parents’-worst-nightmare stories, like that of Damon Janes, the 16-year-old high school running back from Brocton, N.Y., who lost consciousness after an apparent helmet-to-helmet collision during a game this past September and died in the hospital soon afterward.

Read more

USA Football wants to change youth football. Does Heads Up Football work?

USA Football’s release this week of a two-year study on youth football injuries represents the latest attempt to answer two key questions for parents.

Should I let my kid play football? And if I do, at what age should he start?

These questions are being debated across the country with various opinions by different medical experts and researchers. The answers are significant to USA Football and the NFL, which financially supports USA Football and its Heads Up Football program.

Football participation across the United States has dropped five straight years. More than half a million fewer players are participating in football since 2007. USA Football Executive Director Scott Hallenbeck even says he thinks more youth players could transition from tackle to flag football.

Read more

Football Helmets Don’t Protect Side of Head From Blows in Tests

Players using current football helmets aren’t adequately protected against hits to the side of the head, which can lead to sometimes-lethal concussions and brain swelling, researchers said.

Ten helmets tested by researchers reduced the likelihood of traumatic brain injury by an average of 20 percent compared with no helmet in a simulation using crash test dummies. The most effective helmet reduced the risk by only 30 percent, according to data released today.

Read more:

NASCAR Media Roundtable: Forcing drivers to sit after a concussion

The long-term effects of head trauma in the NFL, along with other sports, are just now beginning to be realized. This year, NASCAR has mandated baseline cognitive testing for its drivers — a move applauded by some (Dale Earnhardt Jr.) and questioned by others (Brad Keselowski). The question to you: Is NASCAR opening a Pandora’s box? How will the sport enforce sitting a driver not cleared by doctors when championship and future sponsorship considerations are on the line? Can this objectively be accomplished?

Read more

New study on football helmet safety

They are the first line of defense in a violent sport but just how much protection do football helmets provide?

A new study reveals the ones currently used on the field may do little.

It’s been thought that helmets are better at protecting the skull than the brain.

Especially important for young athletes who’s brains are still developing. But so using new technology, these researchers put some popular helmets to the test, and here’s what they found.

Read more

Rugby – Concussion risks in sport ignored – new study

Brain injuries are far too prevalent in sport, with many players ignoring warning signs of danger after a big knock, a new study has found.

Sport accounts for one in five traumatic brain injuries in New Zealand, with nearly half of those likely to have a high risk of complications.

Previous studies held sport accountable for about 15 per cent of head injuries but research published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport this month shows that to have increased to 21 per cent.

Read more

Safely returning teens to sports after a concussion

Many parents wonder how soon after their child suffers a concussion is it safe to let their child play sports.

Doctors at the University at Buffalo may have discovered a testing process to safely allow athletes back in the game sooner. And along the way, they found some results that might scare some parents.

Read more

Tony Dorsett Is Losing His Mind

It was January 3, 1983, the last day of the NFL’s strike-shortened season, and Tony Dorsett’s Dallas Cowboys were losing to the Minnesota Vikings onMonday Night Football. A fumbled punt had the Cowboys trapped deep in their own territory, the ball a few inches outside the end zone.

And the Cowboys were out-manned. Fullback Ron Springs didn’t hear what play they were going to run, so he was still on the sideline, leaving only 10Cowboys on the field and Dorsett all alone in the backfield.

Read more

Soccer ‘headers’ and concussions: Riskier than we thought?

Soccer players have always been assured that heading the ball — redirecting it by having it bounce off the head — is harmless when done correctly.

But brain researchers say the practice needs to be studied more to determine it’s a true risk for concussion.

Read more