Google+
Home / Tag Archives: Second impact (page 8)

Tag Archives: Second impact

A permit for youth football safety?

Robb Rehberg, Executive Director of Sport Safety International supports the idea of New York City using its civic authority to help fill those gaps.

“Youth football needs to establish a medical standard of care, and while it would be most desirable for such a standard to be established through culture change and ‘buy-in’ from all stakeholders, sometimes a legislative remedy is necessary to effect change,” Rehberg said. “Perhaps the power of the permit can serve as the catalyst for that culture change.”

Read more

Does Your Kid Have a Concussion? Tips for Parents

A concussion is an invisible injury that can not be seen by MRI, CAT scan or X-rays. A concussion can affect the way a person thinks, feels and remembers things. Someone with a concussion can be sensitive to loud and repetitive noises and bright noises. It can make a person sleepy, emotional, distracted, moody and forgetful and it can be caused by a hit to the head or whiplash or anything that causes a sharp jarring to the head.

Because it can’t be diagnosed by X-ray, doctors diagnose it by asking questions and getting patients to do simple physical activities — my son had to touch his nose and then touch the doctor’s hand over and over.

Read more

Lawmakers, Obama butt heads on football

President Obama said he wouldn’t let his son play pro football, but many lawmakers have a different perspective.

An avid pigskin fan, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) said he understands the risks.

Read more

NCAA concussion defense: Sporting event organizers aren’t liable for obvious injury risks

As ex athletes seek medical help and lawyers jockey for position and money in the lawsuits, the NCAA’s defense is crystalizing. The legal argument emerging is this: The NCAA has no legal duty to protect college athletes.

The NCAA was one of several defendants named in a wrongful death suit brought by the family of Frostburg State football player Derek Sheely, who died in 2011 after suffering a brain injury during preseason practice. The lawsuit in Maryland state court claims Frostburg State coaches kept berating Sheely to continue practicing even though he was bleeding profusely from his forehead after multiple hits to the head over several days of practices.

Read more

Concussion specialist may begin new era in Sochi

In another sign of the growing concern about head trauma in sports, the NHL and the U.S. ski team will each have at least one concussion expert at the Sochi Olympics.

Dr. Jeff Kutcher, a Michigan-based neurologist, will be in one of two hockey arenas and the on-hill physician for three events on the slopes in Russia.

U.S. ski team medical director Kyle Wilkens said Kutcher will be the association’s first specialist evaluating and treating concussions during the Winter Olympics.

Read more

Concussions and Cold Weather: Do Plunging Temperatures Make Head Injuries More Likely?

Even with the decline in concussions, there were still 228 sustained in the 2013 preseason and regular season, slightly fewer than one per game. With the Super Bowl kicking off Sunday night, Dr. Andrew Naidech, M.D. of Neurology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, says no evidence has been found to suggest colder weather creates a higher risk for a concussion.

Read more

Is Football Safe Enough for Kids? 40 Percent Say No

An NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll has discovered a startling statistic on public attitudes toward the number one sport in America.

Read more

The Concussion Crisis Is Deadlier Than Ever — Can Tech Solve It?

The technology surrounding concussions is fundamentally changing.

First, advancements in testing technology allow researchers to more deeply understand an athlete’s recovery process. They’ve discovered an athlete can still suffer from a TBI months after the incident, much longer than previously thought. Often, the athlete isn’t even aware he’s still recovering. He may feel fine, even if his brain is not.

Read more

 

Educating to reduce concussions in athletics

While a new state law has drawn attention for strengthening efforts to reduce concussions in high school football and other sports, it also requires training, education and adherence to certain protocols for other youth sports organizations.

The law, which became effective on June 30, applies not just to high schools that are members of the Michigan High School Athletic Association (MHSAA), but also to youth sports organizations and schools such as physical education, intramurals and out-of-season summer camps and clinics.

Read more

Poll: Support For High School Football, Despite Concussion Risks

An NPR poll finds that just 7 percent of Americans say concussion risks are too great to continue offering football as a high school sport. But 44 percent of those surveyed said equipment and safety need to be improved.

Making sure that children are active often means getting them interested in sports. But parents have to weigh the health risks of those sports, including hits that can cause concussions.

Read more: