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Tag Archives: soccer

Scientists unveil pitch count for head injury prevention

Doctors focused on lowering risk of sports concussions and long-term head injuries introduced Hit Count, a data-driven personal analysis platform backed by Dr. Chris Nowinski of Sports Legacy Institute.

Hit Count was designed to establish guidelines for help parents and coaches regulate the allowance of brain trauma in children.

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Concussions Common in Middle School Girls Playing Soccer: Study

Girls who play soccer in middle school are vulnerable to concussions, new research shows.

And despite medical advice to the contrary, many play through their injury, increasing the risk of a second concussion, the study found.

Although awareness has increased about sports concussions, little research has been done on middle school athletes, especially girls, noted study co-author Dr. Melissa Schiff, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle.
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Sports are for Everyone program gets support from U.S. Navy

The hard-working, fun-loving people who run Sports Are for Everyone (SAFE), a nonprofit program for children with challenges, will now have volunteer support from the U.S. Navy.

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Four More Studies Find Causal Links Between CTE and Contact Sports and Suicide Scientifically Premature

Four new scientific papers are adding to the growing chorus of researchers pouring cold water on the now common assumption in the media and general population that contact sports causes CTE, and that CTE causes those with the disease to commit suicide.

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Football concussion lawsuits reach high school: Mississippi suit goes after NCAA and NFHS

Football concussion lawsuits have reached the high school game on a national scale.

A Mississippi father of a high school football player filed a class-action lawsuit this week against the NCAA and the National Federation of State High School Associations. The suit seeks to represent a class of all current high school football players in the United States as of December 2013.

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Extensive study on concussions in youth sports finds ‘culture of resistance’ for self-reporting injury

Young athletes in the U.S. face a “culture of resistance” to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. The report provides a broad examination of concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged 5 to 21. Overall, reported concussions rates are more frequent among high school athletes than college athletes in some sports — including football, men’s lacrosse and soccer, and baseball; higher for competition than practice (except for cheerleading); and highest in football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, soccer, and women’s basketball. Concussion rates also appear higher for youths with a history of prior concussions and among female athletes.

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Protect Your Child From Concussions In Sports

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.6 to 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries, such as concussions, occur each year. Most concussions go undiagnosed and untreated, which increases the risk of serious long-term effects in athletes. In light of the media’s recent attention on the NFL and NHL players’ lawsuits, parents might understandably be concerned for the safety of their children. Parents can protect their children by recognizing the signs of a concussion and following a few helpful tips.

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Safety campaigners want to BAN children from heading footballs until their teens

Children should be ‘banned’ from heading footballs, according to a leading sports safety campaigner.

Former professional wrestler Chris Nowinski suffered from concussion due to numerous blows to the head when playing American football at college.

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CHILD SAFETY UPDATE: Protect Your Child From Concussions In Sports

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.6 to 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries, such as concussions, occur each year. Most concussions go undiagnosed and untreated, which increases the risk of serious long-term effects in athletes. In light of the media’s recent attention on the NFL and NHL players’ lawsuits, parents might understandably be concerned for the safety of their children. Parents can protect their children by recognizing the signs of a concussion and following a few helpful tips.

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New Guidelines Rule Out Same-Day Return to Play for Athletes with Concussion Updated Consensus Statement Includes New Concussion Recognition Tool, Reports Neurosurgery

Any athlete with concussion symptoms should not be allowed to return to play on the same day, according to the latest consensus statement on sports-related concussion. The updated guidelines are summarized in Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

The fourth consensus report from the Concussion in Sport Group (CISG 4) represents the latest recommendations from an expert panel, sponsored by five international sports governing bodies.

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