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Tag Archives: sports medicine

Sport Safety International teams with Pennsylvania Athletic Trainers’ Society and the Pennsylvania Medical Society to Provide Concussion Education.

Sport Safety International has teamed with Pennsylvania Athletic Trainers’ Society and the Pennsylvania Medical Society to conduct Department of Health  approved ConcussionWise education. This education will provide culturally competent, skills-based Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) training to health care professionals involved with youth athletes as well as physicians.

For information on how to register for these courses click here

Concussions, by the New Book

For decades in the N.F.L., the operative term for the situation was that someone “got dinged.” It was a cute, almost harmless-sounding description of what was often a concussion or a worrying subconcussive blow to the head.

But with the N.F.L. agreeing to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to settle a lawsuit brought by about 5,000 former players who said the league hid from them the dangers of repeated hits to the head, a backpedaling league has corrected its lingo and hastily amended its methodology. The N.F.L. now has a concussion management protocol, outlined in an inches-thick document that commands teams to institute a specific, detailed game-day and postconcussion course of action.

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Football concussions: Amid the fear, UGA research brings some hope

While most concussion research focuses on college and professional players or young children, a team of neuroscientists at the University of Georgia is tackling an often overlooked cohort of athletes.

The average Joes are middle-aged men who played football, but not in any kind of national spotlight. They suffered concussions during their glory days on the high school gridiron.

Each participant underwent an fMRI scan, which measures brain activity by detecting changes in blood flow within the brain. An image of the brain appears on the computer screen, and as the volunteer performs various mental tasks, different regions light up to different degrees, representing activity in those areas.

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Concussion dangers go beyond football, cross gender lines

The rate of concussions among U.S. high school athletes has more than doubled between 2005 and 2012, with numbers now as high as 300,000 per year, according to a study published this year in The American Journal of Sports Medicine.

 

While 29 percent of those concussions happened in football, the danger of such head injuriestranscends into other sports. It crosses gender lines as well.

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Virginia Tech participates in NCAA initiative to limit concussions among college athletes, military personnel

Virginia Tech is participating in a new, landmark $30 million national effort sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the U.S. Department of Defense to combat concussions among college athletes and active service military personnel.

The NCAA-U.S. Department of Defense initiative funds the most comprehensive study of concussion and head impact exposure ever conducted. It will enroll an estimated 25,000 male and female NCAA student-athletes during a three-year study period. Virginia Tech will focus on athletes participating in various sports, including football, women’s soccer, men’s soccer, and women’s lacrosse.

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Concussion Risks Haven’t Slowed Down High School Football

Despite overwhelming evidence of the sport’s dangers, high school football participation is down just 2% since 2008. Since the kids won’t kick the sport, legislators and state athletic associations are trying to make it safer.

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Experts: More girls suffering from post-concussion headaches

While football players are considered to be the most at risk, females are gaining ground in every sport from soccer and volleyball to basketball and cheerleading.

More and more girls are suffering from post-concussion headaches.

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California law limits school football practices to cut concussions

Football practices at which middle- and high-school students tackle each other will be restricted in California under a law signed on Monday by Democratic Governor Jerry Brown, the latest U.S. effort to minimize brain injuries from the popular sport.

The measure, which limits practices with full-on tackling during the playing season and prohibits them during most of the off-season, comes amid growing concern nationwide over brain damage that can result from concussions among student as well as professional athletes. 

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VIDEO Sport Safety International Executive Director Dr. Robb Rehberg, appears on Rep. Pascrell’s “To the Point”

U.S. Congressman Bill Pascrell, Jr. (D-NJ-09), founder and co-chair of the Congressional Brain Injury Task Force, today released the latest installment of  “To the Point” entitled “Fair Play: Protecting our student athletes from sports-related concussions”, in which he discusses the dangers of concussions in youth sports and how we can better protect our youngest athletes on the playing field. 

Guests include Niki Popyer, a former high school athlete from Marlboro, NJ who sustained multiple sports-related concussions; Dr. Robb Rehberg, Executive Director of Sport Safety International, and; Dr. Seth Stoller, Neurology Chief for the Concussion Center at the Atlantic Neuroscience Institute at Overlook Hospital in Summit. Watch the Video

Heading off danger: Concussions and teens

It’s a hot July afternoon, just before a thunderstorm. The Bonnette family is in the living room next to a fan, discussing schedules. 17-year-old Giuliana Bonnette plays the right side position for the varsity volleyball team at Dominion High School in Sterling. She is now recovered from two concussions she suffered in the spring.

“It started out as just a really bad headache, and a little bit of confusion,” Bonnette said.

These were Giuliana Bonnette’s symptoms after her first concussion 6 months ago. Her head slammed against the ground during volleyball tryouts. It was first diagnosed as whiplash.

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