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Tag Archives: SSI

Doctors Have Ethical Duty to Protect Athletes from Concussions: Paper

Every year, there are up to 4 million sports-related concussions in America. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) released a new position papertoday outlining doctors’ ethical duties in protecting athletes from these injuries—and maintains that physicians’ obligation to keep patients safe sometimes trumps patient autonomy.

The paper, published in the online edition of the journal Neurology, coincides with the Sports Concussion Conference from July 11 to July 13, during which the academy will discuss advents in concussion diagnostics and treatments. The statement’s publication also comes several days after a federal judge issued preliminary approval of a settlement between theNational Football League and approximately 4,500 former players, who have claimed concussion-related injuries, including debilitating conditions such as Lou Gehrig’s disease, as well as early-onset Alzheimer’s and dementia, among others. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention figures cited by the academy, the vast majority of sports concussions are football-related.

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Soccer Concussions Are More Frequent Than You Think

In addition to the many enduring memories of great performances from this year’s World Cup, a slew of head injuries will linger as well. Brazilian star Neymar is going to miss the rest of the tournament with a broken vertebra, sparking complaints that FIFA has encouraged referees to be more lenient about dangerous play. Yellow and red cards have been handed out at the lowest levels since 1986.

This purported attempt to speed up play may have tragic consequences. Soccer is already one of the most dangerous sports—more dangerous than you might expect, according to a wide variety of data, especially in terms of concussions.

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NCAA releases football hitting and concussion safety guidelines

The NCAA released Monday new guidelines for concussion safety, including limiting live contact football practices to two per week during the season.

The guidelines address contact at football practices, independent medical care for all athletes, and best practices to diagnose and manage concussions. The NCAA, which faces multiple concussion lawsuits, worked with the College Athletic Trainers’ Society, several medical organizations, multiple conferences and the American Football Coaches Association to create guidelines, not rules.

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Connecticut School Officials Welcome New Concussion Law

A state law that went into effect July 1, aimed at reducing the number of concussions in children, can prevent students from participating in athletics unless they receive information or complete training.

“An Act Concerning Youth Athletics and Concussions” was introduced by the Committee on Children. It requires the state Board of Education to work with the state’s Public Health Department to develop a “concussion education plan.” Local boards of education would then adopt the plan by using “written materials, online training or videos or in person training,” the bill states.

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After concussion report, Optimist Youth Football replaces 900 helmets

Optimist Youth Football says it has replaced hundreds of helmets after a KTVB report on football helmet ratings and concussions.

In original stories that aired in February, local high school coaches, trainers and sporting goods dealers talked about a Virginia Tech study that indicates certain football helmets may cut concussion risks.

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Busting 7 Myths About Kids, Concussions and Sports

People often associate concussions in youth sports with football. But the problem goes far beyond America’s most popular sport.

“Better education among parents, coaches and kids is critical,” says Richard So, MD, a pediatrician atCleveland Clinic Children’s. With that in mind, Dr. So and Dr. Genin seek to bust several common myths and misconceptions about youth sports and concussions.

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NOCSAE warns football helmet rating system cannot predict ability to prevent concussions

The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) applauds and encourages the growing research in the area of concussion protection for athletes, including the work released this month by Virginia Tech. Coaches, consumers and parents should be aware that while the STAR rating system suggests the purchase of specific football helmets, scientific evidence does not support the claim that a particular helmet brand or model is more effective in reducing the occurrence of concussive events.

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Concussions in Youth Sports Being Studied by the US Government

Brain injuries in youth sports have been on the rise in recent years, alarming many parents about the lifelong effects of concussions. The number of brain injuries linked to American youth increased 62 percent between the years of 2001 and 2009, with reported incidents around 250,000 in 2009 (Obama, NFL, NCAA Get Behind Research into Concussions in Youth Sports: Insurance Journal, May 29, 2014).

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AMA says cheerleading should be designated a sport

The nation’s largest doctors’ group adopted that as policy this week at its annual meeting in Chicago. AMA members say cheerleading is as rigorous as many other activities that high schools and the NCAA consider sports. Adding it to the list would mean more safety measures for cheerleaders and proper training for their coaches.

Cheerleading is a leading cause of catastrophic injury in female athletes at the high school and college level, Dr. Samantha Rosman, a Boston-area pediatrician, told AMA delegates during floor debate before the vote.

“These girls are flipping 10, 20 feet in the air,” Rosman said. “We need to stand up for what is right for our patients and demand they get the same protection as their football colleagues.”

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Dan Marino to withdraw from NFL concussion lawsuit

Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino yesterday said he will withdraw from a lawsuit that accuses the National Football League of hiding the effects of concussions because he was inadvertently listed as a plaintiff in the case.

Marino, 52, who was the highest-profile former player involved in legal action against the league over head injuries,  said in a statement issued to Sports Illustrated magazine that in the past year he authorized a legal claim to be made on his behalf if he ever needed medical coverage due to the long-term effects of football-related head trauma.

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