Google+
Home / Tag Archives: student (page 2)

Tag Archives: student

Selecting a Concussion Educator: Robb Rehberg Thinks Athletic Trainers Best Suited For The Role

With youth sports concussion safety laws in place in all 50 states, increased public awareness about concussions, and growing concernabout the long-term effect of repetitive head impacts, the demand for concussion education, not just for parents, coaches, and athletes, but for health care professionals as well is at an all-time high, and promises to go even higher in the coming years.

But who should sports programs – whether school-based or independently run – hire to educate athletes, coaches, and parents about concussions? What kind of training, education and experience should they have?

We decided to ask a number of leading concussion educators.  First up is Robb Rehberg, Professor and Coordinator of Athletic Training Clinical Education at William Paterson University in Wayne, New Jersey.

Read more: 

With high school football concussion cases rising, limits on contact at practice likely

Terry O’Neil unsuccessfully tried to steer the audience in an accurate direction.

The question from the former New Orleans Saints executive to those in the Palisades Ballroom in UCLA’s Carnesale Commons on Tuesday afternoon was, “How many concussions occurred on NFL practice fields last season?”

He began counting down from 400. The lower he went, the louder the audience voiced he was counting in the wrong direction. O’Neil appeased the disbelieving audience, asking about numbers as high as 600 before ending the exchange with a thud.

Read more:

NCAA releases football hitting and concussion safety guidelines

The NCAA released Monday new guidelines for concussion safety, including limiting live contact football practices to two per week during the season.

The guidelines address contact at football practices, independent medical care for all athletes, and best practices to diagnose and manage concussions. The NCAA, which faces multiple concussion lawsuits, worked with the College Athletic Trainers’ Society, several medical organizations, multiple conferences and the American Football Coaches Association to create guidelines, not rules.

Read more:

Connecticut School Officials Welcome New Concussion Law

A state law that went into effect July 1, aimed at reducing the number of concussions in children, can prevent students from participating in athletics unless they receive information or complete training.

“An Act Concerning Youth Athletics and Concussions” was introduced by the Committee on Children. It requires the state Board of Education to work with the state’s Public Health Department to develop a “concussion education plan.” Local boards of education would then adopt the plan by using “written materials, online training or videos or in person training,” the bill states.

Read more:

Busting 7 Myths About Kids, Concussions and Sports

People often associate concussions in youth sports with football. But the problem goes far beyond America’s most popular sport.

“Better education among parents, coaches and kids is critical,” says Richard So, MD, a pediatrician atCleveland Clinic Children’s. With that in mind, Dr. So and Dr. Genin seek to bust several common myths and misconceptions about youth sports and concussions.

Read more

Concussions in Youth Sports Being Studied by the US Government

Brain injuries in youth sports have been on the rise in recent years, alarming many parents about the lifelong effects of concussions. The number of brain injuries linked to American youth increased 62 percent between the years of 2001 and 2009, with reported incidents around 250,000 in 2009 (Obama, NFL, NCAA Get Behind Research into Concussions in Youth Sports: Insurance Journal, May 29, 2014).

Read more:

Should youth hockey rules change to prevent concussions?

Much of the conversation concerning kids and concussions has so far focused on football. Now the American Academy of Pediatrics says the number of dangerous injuries in youth ice hockey is on the rise, and the group is offering new recommendations that would change the way the sport is played.

According to USA Hockey, the governing body for youth hockey in the United States, more that 350,000 boys and girls lace up the skates in the U.S.  And for boys ages 13 and older, checking is a big part of the game.  

Read more:

Medical College of Wisconsin Part of $30 Million Concussion Study

Researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin will be part of a major study on sports concussions.

President Obama announced the $30 million study Thursday along with the partnership between the NCAA and Department of Defense.

“We’ve got to have every parent, coach and teacher recognize the signs of concussions,” President Obama said.

Along with the University of Michigan and Indiana University School of Medicine, researches at the Medical College of Wisconsin will track 1,200 Division I NCAA athletes for three years using sensors and cutting-edge technology.

Read more:

Soccer headers leading to concussion

Three weeks ago, Scottsdale’s Julia Taffuri took a ball to the face while competing in Southern California with her Sereno Soccer Club team. After being knocked to the ground, she popped back up, dusted herself off and finished the half.

When she returned to the sideline, however, she started repeating herself and asking unlikely questions, including, “Where are we?” Her coaches immediately pulled her from the game, fearing what was confirmed later that day in a hospital: She had suffered a concussion.

Read more:

Concussion Rates Double Among High School Athletes

The rate of concussions in U.S. high school athletes more than doubled between 2005 and 2012, new research shows.

The trend probably reflects an increased awareness and more legislation governing concussions in student athletes, and not more danger in sports, the study authors noted.

“The bottom line is that rates have gone up,” said lead researcher Dr. Joseph Rosenthal, an assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Ohio State University. “We don’t know the exact reason. This was an observational study, so I can’t say for sure, but I believe what is explaining the increase is the increased awareness, not that sports are more dangerous. It’s just that the concussions are being recognized more, which is good news.”

Read more: