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Tag Archives: USA Football

Study Showing Helmet Design Can Reduce Concussion Risk Leaves Many Questions Unanswered

The design of football helmets can effect concussion risk, finds a new study by some of the nation’s top concussion researchers.

The study provides what the authors say is good clinical evidence that helmet design can lower the risk of concussion, not in a laboratory, but in games and practices, by showing that a helmet model introduced in 2000 provides better protection against concussion than an older helmet employing 20-year-old design technology. 

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Do dangers of concussion among youth outweigh benefits of sports?

Sports-related brain injuries are a hot topic these days. There are the headline-grabbing reports of professional athletes like Barnaby whose careers were sidelined by concussion. There is the ever-growing list of retired football and hockey players who have been diagnosed post-mortem — often post-suicide — with the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), allegedly brought on by repetitive head trauma. And then there are the parents’-worst-nightmare stories, like that of Damon Janes, the 16-year-old high school running back from Brocton, N.Y., who lost consciousness after an apparent helmet-to-helmet collision during a game this past September and died in the hospital soon afterward.

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USA Football wants to change youth football. Does Heads Up Football work?

USA Football’s release this week of a two-year study on youth football injuries represents the latest attempt to answer two key questions for parents.

Should I let my kid play football? And if I do, at what age should he start?

These questions are being debated across the country with various opinions by different medical experts and researchers. The answers are significant to USA Football and the NFL, which financially supports USA Football and its Heads Up Football program.

Football participation across the United States has dropped five straight years. More than half a million fewer players are participating in football since 2007. USA Football Executive Director Scott Hallenbeck even says he thinks more youth players could transition from tackle to flag football.

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Football Helmets Don’t Protect Side of Head From Blows in Tests

Players using current football helmets aren’t adequately protected against hits to the side of the head, which can lead to sometimes-lethal concussions and brain swelling, researchers said.

Ten helmets tested by researchers reduced the likelihood of traumatic brain injury by an average of 20 percent compared with no helmet in a simulation using crash test dummies. The most effective helmet reduced the risk by only 30 percent, according to data released today.

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New study on football helmet safety

They are the first line of defense in a violent sport but just how much protection do football helmets provide?

A new study reveals the ones currently used on the field may do little.

It’s been thought that helmets are better at protecting the skull than the brain.

Especially important for young athletes who’s brains are still developing. But so using new technology, these researchers put some popular helmets to the test, and here’s what they found.

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A permit for youth football safety?

Robb Rehberg, Executive Director of Sport Safety International supports the idea of New York City using its civic authority to help fill those gaps.

“Youth football needs to establish a medical standard of care, and while it would be most desirable for such a standard to be established through culture change and ‘buy-in’ from all stakeholders, sometimes a legislative remedy is necessary to effect change,” Rehberg said. “Perhaps the power of the permit can serve as the catalyst for that culture change.”

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Does Your Kid Have a Concussion? Tips for Parents

A concussion is an invisible injury that can not be seen by MRI, CAT scan or X-rays. A concussion can affect the way a person thinks, feels and remembers things. Someone with a concussion can be sensitive to loud and repetitive noises and bright noises. It can make a person sleepy, emotional, distracted, moody and forgetful and it can be caused by a hit to the head or whiplash or anything that causes a sharp jarring to the head.

Because it can’t be diagnosed by X-ray, doctors diagnose it by asking questions and getting patients to do simple physical activities — my son had to touch his nose and then touch the doctor’s hand over and over.

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Is Football Safe Enough for Kids? 40 Percent Say No

An NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll has discovered a startling statistic on public attitudes toward the number one sport in America.

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NFL pushing legislation to overhaul concussion protocol for youth sports

Legislation for federal funding to help protect student athletes from concussions got the National Football League’s backing Monday in the shadow of the stadium where the Super Bowl will be played this weekend.

NFL Senior Vice President Adolpho Birch joined two New Jersey lawmakers in support of legislation drafted following the 2008 death of a New Jersey high school football player.

The proposal by Sen. Robert Menendez and Rep. Bill Pascrell involves national concussion guidelines currently under development for schools and youth sport programs by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The legislation would authorize a 5-year grant program to bring those guidelines to school sports programs nationwide.

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Scientists unveil pitch count for head injury prevention

Doctors focused on lowering risk of sports concussions and long-term head injuries introduced Hit Count, a data-driven personal analysis platform backed by Dr. Chris Nowinski of Sports Legacy Institute.

Hit Count was designed to establish guidelines for help parents and coaches regulate the allowance of brain trauma in children.

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