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Tag Archives: USA Football

Sports are for Everyone program gets support from U.S. Navy

The hard-working, fun-loving people who run Sports Are for Everyone (SAFE), a nonprofit program for children with challenges, will now have volunteer support from the U.S. Navy.

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Obama On NFL Concussions: ‘I Would Not Let My Son Play Pro Football’

President Barack Obama again voiced concern about the National Football League’s concussion rate, acknowledging that players “know what they’re doing” but adding that he would not want his child to play the sport at the professional level.

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Indiana bill would require concussion training, waiting period for football

Indiana could soon become the first state to require high school football coaches to take part in a player safety and concussion-training course.

Senate Bill 222 — authored by Sen. Travis Holdman, R–Markle — would require the course every two years.

“We’d be very proud to do this since USA Football, an arm of the NFL and players union is basically housed” in Indianapolis, Holdman said.

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Heads Up is now employed by 2,700 youth leagues

The Katy Youth Football league plays its annual championship games in a 10,000-seat stadium. Based outside of Houston, the league boasts 58 teams and more than 1,600 players, including 6-year-olds who wobble comically under 3-pound helmets before crashing into each other and falling down.

The league also could be considered a human laboratory for the National Football League. Led by commissioner Roger Goodell, the NFL has spent $1.5 million to persuade parents in leagues like Katy that it is making football safer by teaching tackling techniques that will reduce concussions.

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The Professional Football Athletic Trainers Society endorses USA Football’s Heads Up Football Program

The Professional Football Athletic Trainers Society has partnered with USA Football to advance youth and high school football player safety by endorsing USA Football’s Heads Up football program.

About 2,800 youth football leagues representing approximately 600,000 players in 50 states and Washington, D.C., registered for Heads Up Football in 2013 in a commitment to their young athletes’ health and safety. The program is being piloted on the high school level this fall in 35 schools spanning 10 states.

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The concussion doctor’s connections

Learn more about Dr. Robert C. Cantu’s relationships and connections.

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The concussion doctor’s tangled interests

He is America’s concussion doctor, a pioneer in the fight against sports-related brain damage. Dr. Robert C. Cantu is on call amid football’s concussion crisis: congressional hearings, courthouses, NFL meetings, helmet safety panels, operating rooms, research labs, television studios, film documentaries.

In the 45 years since he became a neurosurgeon in Boston, Cantu has become a fixture on the front lines of a public health campaign that is reshaping the way football in America is played.

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Youth safety program gets medical nods

USA Football’s Heads Up Football program has become the first youth sports program to earn official support from three major medical entities.

The American College of Sports Medicine, the National Athletic Trainers Association, and the Professional Football Athletic Trainers Society, organizations representing more than 80,000 medical professionals, have approved the youth football initiative.

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Extensive study on concussions in youth sports finds ‘culture of resistance’ for self-reporting injury

Young athletes in the U.S. face a “culture of resistance” to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. The report provides a broad examination of concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged 5 to 21. Overall, reported concussions rates are more frequent among high school athletes than college athletes in some sports — including football, men’s lacrosse and soccer, and baseball; higher for competition than practice (except for cheerleading); and highest in football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, soccer, and women’s basketball. Concussion rates also appear higher for youths with a history of prior concussions and among female athletes.

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Protect Your Child From Concussions In Sports

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.6 to 3.8 million sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries, such as concussions, occur each year. Most concussions go undiagnosed and untreated, which increases the risk of serious long-term effects in athletes. In light of the media’s recent attention on the NFL and NHL players’ lawsuits, parents might understandably be concerned for the safety of their children. Parents can protect their children by recognizing the signs of a concussion and following a few helpful tips.

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