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Tag Archives: Youth Sports Safety

NFL pushing legislation to overhaul concussion protocol for youth sports

Legislation for federal funding to help protect student athletes from concussions got the National Football League’s backing Monday in the shadow of the stadium where the Super Bowl will be played this weekend.

NFL Senior Vice President Adolpho Birch joined two New Jersey lawmakers in support of legislation drafted following the 2008 death of a New Jersey high school football player.

The proposal by Sen. Robert Menendez and Rep. Bill Pascrell involves national concussion guidelines currently under development for schools and youth sport programs by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The legislation would authorize a 5-year grant program to bring those guidelines to school sports programs nationwide.

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Scientists unveil pitch count for head injury prevention

Doctors focused on lowering risk of sports concussions and long-term head injuries introduced Hit Count, a data-driven personal analysis platform backed by Dr. Chris Nowinski of Sports Legacy Institute.

Hit Count was designed to establish guidelines for help parents and coaches regulate the allowance of brain trauma in children.

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Sports and concussions: should we worry?

“It felt like my brain was floating on a cloud inside my head,” Nic Latham says, a former Denison student athlete who had to be excused from playing due to excessive head trauma from lacrosse.

For the amount of talk that goes into head injuries causing memory loss, the first concussion seems to stick in the brains of the affected like superglue.

Latham, the former midfielder and a face-off specialist who earned all-state honors as a junior in high school, continues, “It was April 30, 2011. I was knocked out for 10-15 seconds or so and then was very dizzy. Once the adrenaline came down from playing, I got a pretty bad headache and whiplash to the point where I couldn’t move my neck for a week.”

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#C4CT Concussion Awareness Summit to be held at United Nations

Amarantus BioScience Holdings, Inc. (otcqb:AMBS), a biotechnology company focused on the discovery and development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics related to neurodegeneration and apoptosis, and Brewer Sports International (BSI), a multi-faceted global sports advisory firm, are pleased to provide an update surrounding the Amarantus #C4CT Summit hosted by Brewer Sports International, powered by MDM Worldwide, to be held on Wednesday, January 29 in the Trusteeship Council at the United Nations in New York City, NY during Super Bowl Week.

The conference will unite industry experts, leading scientists, neurologists and international business leaders with current and former professional athletes in effort to create consensus on the path forward for scientific research and commercial development.

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Mississippi coaches give take on concussion law

A coach’s job, especially in high school, can be a difficult one when it comes to player safety.

Sometimes when a game is on the line, the temptation to push that player is always there. Even when a coach senses that his or her player is hurt, when the player says he or she can go, that coach is faced with the tough decision of rather to send the player back out there or whether he or she needs to sit the player out.

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Former NFL player talks about concussions in sports

Concussions are a worry for many kids in sports, both girls and boys.

According to 10-year NFL veteran Robert Jones, football fans sport their team colors, while football players show their true colors.

“It is the only game to me, that I feel, that brings out what’s really inside the people that are playing on the field,” said Robert.

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Private schools in California must comply with concussion rules

A new state law in California will hold private and charter schools to the same sports safety standards as public schools.

Assembly Bill 588 was signed into law in September 2013 and went into effect Jan. 1. The bill stipulates that if a student in a school athletic activity is suspected of suffering a head injury during practice or a game, that student may not play for the rest of the day.

 The athlete may only return to sports and training after being evaluated by a doctor who is experienced in treating concussions.

New concussion guidance issued in Scotland

Schools and sports clubs across Scotland are being sent a new leaflet with a “potentially lifesaving message” about the dangers of concussion for youngsters.

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Concussions Common in Middle School Girls Playing Soccer: Study

Girls who play soccer in middle school are vulnerable to concussions, new research shows.

And despite medical advice to the contrary, many play through their injury, increasing the risk of a second concussion, the study found.

Although awareness has increased about sports concussions, little research has been done on middle school athletes, especially girls, noted study co-author Dr. Melissa Schiff, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle.
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Citing Costs, N.H.L. Injury Study Urges More Safety

An author of a new medical study said the high cost of paying injured N.H.L. players should push the league to stiffen what he described as inadequate measures to prevent brain trauma, including rules that still allow fighting.

“N.H.L. owners need to do a better job of protecting their athletes — if not for their players, then for their own pocketbooks,” said the author, Dr. Michael Cusimano, a neurosurgeon at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.

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