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Tag Archives: Youth Sports Safety

Concussion risk in sports should not be overstated

Concussions in football have become the target of rules and lawsuits. Current and former football players speak out regularly on the subject, even opining on whether their children will be playing the sport.

To date, the biggest newsmaker is the NFL, where more than 4,500 former players have filed suit, some accusing the league of fraud for its handling of concussions. They include former Dallas Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett and Super Bowl-winning Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon, who suffers from dementia.

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Sports are for Everyone program gets support from U.S. Navy

The hard-working, fun-loving people who run Sports Are for Everyone (SAFE), a nonprofit program for children with challenges, will now have volunteer support from the U.S. Navy.

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Obama On NFL Concussions: ‘I Would Not Let My Son Play Pro Football’

President Barack Obama again voiced concern about the National Football League’s concussion rate, acknowledging that players “know what they’re doing” but adding that he would not want his child to play the sport at the professional level.

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Indiana bill would require concussion training, waiting period for football

Indiana could soon become the first state to require high school football coaches to take part in a player safety and concussion-training course.

Senate Bill 222 — authored by Sen. Travis Holdman, R–Markle — would require the course every two years.

“We’d be very proud to do this since USA Football, an arm of the NFL and players union is basically housed” in Indianapolis, Holdman said.

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Teen Concussions Increase Risk for Depression

Teens with a history of concussions are more than three times as likely to suffer from depression as teens who have never had a concussion, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Four More Studies Find Causal Links Between CTE and Contact Sports and Suicide Scientifically Premature

Four new scientific papers are adding to the growing chorus of researchers pouring cold water on the now common assumption in the media and general population that contact sports causes CTE, and that CTE causes those with the disease to commit suicide.

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W.Va. board approves sports concussions policy

The state Board of Education on Wednesday approved new rules on how high schools handle sports concussions, including requiring that a licensed health care professional clear athletes to return to action.

Last year, legislators passed a law requiring the Secondary School Activities Commission to draft regulations aimed at preventing youth concussions. Among other things, they require schools to increase awareness and warn players of the risks of continuing to play after they suffer a concussion.

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A Hockey Safety Checklist for Your Kids

As a Responsible Sport Parent or Coach, what’s more important than teaching your kids the rules of hockey and lessons for life? Insuring their safety on the ice.

That’s why Responsible Sports and the experts at Positive Coaching Alliance have teamed up to create quick safety checklists for both youth sports parents and coaches.  Everything from weather, concussions, and ride homes are covered.

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Heads Up is now employed by 2,700 youth leagues

The Katy Youth Football league plays its annual championship games in a 10,000-seat stadium. Based outside of Houston, the league boasts 58 teams and more than 1,600 players, including 6-year-olds who wobble comically under 3-pound helmets before crashing into each other and falling down.

The league also could be considered a human laboratory for the National Football League. Led by commissioner Roger Goodell, the NFL has spent $1.5 million to persuade parents in leagues like Katy that it is making football safer by teaching tackling techniques that will reduce concussions.

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Power Down to Speed Concussion Recovery: Study

Young people who suffer a concussion often want to return to school and begin using electronics right away, but resuming everyday life too quickly might delay recovery, researchers say.

 Kids who give their brains a few days’ rest and gradually return to normal mental activity heal faster than those who rush back to their books, computers and TVs, a new study suggests.