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Tag Archives: Youth Sports

Football Helmets Don’t Protect Side of Head From Blows in Tests

Players using current football helmets aren’t adequately protected against hits to the side of the head, which can lead to sometimes-lethal concussions and brain swelling, researchers said.

Ten helmets tested by researchers reduced the likelihood of traumatic brain injury by an average of 20 percent compared with no helmet in a simulation using crash test dummies. The most effective helmet reduced the risk by only 30 percent, according to data released today.

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New study on football helmet safety

They are the first line of defense in a violent sport but just how much protection do football helmets provide?

A new study reveals the ones currently used on the field may do little.

It’s been thought that helmets are better at protecting the skull than the brain.

Especially important for young athletes who’s brains are still developing. But so using new technology, these researchers put some popular helmets to the test, and here’s what they found.

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Rugby – Concussion risks in sport ignored – new study

Brain injuries are far too prevalent in sport, with many players ignoring warning signs of danger after a big knock, a new study has found.

Sport accounts for one in five traumatic brain injuries in New Zealand, with nearly half of those likely to have a high risk of complications.

Previous studies held sport accountable for about 15 per cent of head injuries but research published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport this month shows that to have increased to 21 per cent.

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Safely returning teens to sports after a concussion

Many parents wonder how soon after their child suffers a concussion is it safe to let their child play sports.

Doctors at the University at Buffalo may have discovered a testing process to safely allow athletes back in the game sooner. And along the way, they found some results that might scare some parents.

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Tony Dorsett Is Losing His Mind

It was January 3, 1983, the last day of the NFL’s strike-shortened season, and Tony Dorsett’s Dallas Cowboys were losing to the Minnesota Vikings onMonday Night Football. A fumbled punt had the Cowboys trapped deep in their own territory, the ball a few inches outside the end zone.

And the Cowboys were out-manned. Fullback Ron Springs didn’t hear what play they were going to run, so he was still on the sideline, leaving only 10Cowboys on the field and Dorsett all alone in the backfield.

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A permit for youth football safety?

Robb Rehberg, Executive Director of Sport Safety International supports the idea of New York City using its civic authority to help fill those gaps.

“Youth football needs to establish a medical standard of care, and while it would be most desirable for such a standard to be established through culture change and ‘buy-in’ from all stakeholders, sometimes a legislative remedy is necessary to effect change,” Rehberg said. “Perhaps the power of the permit can serve as the catalyst for that culture change.”

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NOCSAE Approves Development of First Football Helmet Standard to Address Concussions

The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) board of directors has approved the development of a revised football helmet standard that will require helmets to limit certain concussion causing forces.

The NOCSAE action to move forward the development of a more comprehensive helmet standard was taken on the heels of new NOCSAE-funded research which identified brain tissue response from a concussive event and the development of a new method to test helmets which replicates some of the rotational forces involved in a concussion. NOCSAE’s helmet standards have eliminated skull fractures in football by requiring the advancement of new helmet technology. This revised standard aims at continuing this advancement by attempting to reduce concussion risk.

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Does Your Kid Have a Concussion? Tips for Parents

A concussion is an invisible injury that can not be seen by MRI, CAT scan or X-rays. A concussion can affect the way a person thinks, feels and remembers things. Someone with a concussion can be sensitive to loud and repetitive noises and bright noises. It can make a person sleepy, emotional, distracted, moody and forgetful and it can be caused by a hit to the head or whiplash or anything that causes a sharp jarring to the head.

Because it can’t be diagnosed by X-ray, doctors diagnose it by asking questions and getting patients to do simple physical activities — my son had to touch his nose and then touch the doctor’s hand over and over.

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Lawmakers, Obama butt heads on football

President Obama said he wouldn’t let his son play pro football, but many lawmakers have a different perspective.

An avid pigskin fan, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) said he understands the risks.

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Concussions and Cold Weather: Do Plunging Temperatures Make Head Injuries More Likely?

Even with the decline in concussions, there were still 228 sustained in the 2013 preseason and regular season, slightly fewer than one per game. With the Super Bowl kicking off Sunday night, Dr. Andrew Naidech, M.D. of Neurology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, says no evidence has been found to suggest colder weather creates a higher risk for a concussion.

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