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Tag Archives: Youth Sports

Private schools in California must comply with concussion rules

A new state law in California will hold private and charter schools to the same sports safety standards as public schools.

Assembly Bill 588 was signed into law in September 2013 and went into effect Jan. 1. The bill stipulates that if a student in a school athletic activity is suspected of suffering a head injury during practice or a game, that student may not play for the rest of the day.

 The athlete may only return to sports and training after being evaluated by a doctor who is experienced in treating concussions.

New concussion guidance issued in Scotland

Schools and sports clubs across Scotland are being sent a new leaflet with a “potentially lifesaving message” about the dangers of concussion for youngsters.

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Concussions Common in Middle School Girls Playing Soccer: Study

Girls who play soccer in middle school are vulnerable to concussions, new research shows.

And despite medical advice to the contrary, many play through their injury, increasing the risk of a second concussion, the study found.

Although awareness has increased about sports concussions, little research has been done on middle school athletes, especially girls, noted study co-author Dr. Melissa Schiff, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health in Seattle.
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Citing Costs, N.H.L. Injury Study Urges More Safety

An author of a new medical study said the high cost of paying injured N.H.L. players should push the league to stiffen what he described as inadequate measures to prevent brain trauma, including rules that still allow fighting.

“N.H.L. owners need to do a better job of protecting their athletes — if not for their players, then for their own pocketbooks,” said the author, Dr. Michael Cusimano, a neurosurgeon at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.

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Concussion risk in sports should not be overstated

Concussions in football have become the target of rules and lawsuits. Current and former football players speak out regularly on the subject, even opining on whether their children will be playing the sport.

To date, the biggest newsmaker is the NFL, where more than 4,500 former players have filed suit, some accusing the league of fraud for its handling of concussions. They include former Dallas Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett and Super Bowl-winning Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon, who suffers from dementia.

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Sports are for Everyone program gets support from U.S. Navy

The hard-working, fun-loving people who run Sports Are for Everyone (SAFE), a nonprofit program for children with challenges, will now have volunteer support from the U.S. Navy.

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Obama On NFL Concussions: ‘I Would Not Let My Son Play Pro Football’

President Barack Obama again voiced concern about the National Football League’s concussion rate, acknowledging that players “know what they’re doing” but adding that he would not want his child to play the sport at the professional level.

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Indiana bill would require concussion training, waiting period for football

Indiana could soon become the first state to require high school football coaches to take part in a player safety and concussion-training course.

Senate Bill 222 — authored by Sen. Travis Holdman, R–Markle — would require the course every two years.

“We’d be very proud to do this since USA Football, an arm of the NFL and players union is basically housed” in Indianapolis, Holdman said.

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Teen Concussions Increase Risk for Depression

Teens with a history of concussions are more than three times as likely to suffer from depression as teens who have never had a concussion, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Four More Studies Find Causal Links Between CTE and Contact Sports and Suicide Scientifically Premature

Four new scientific papers are adding to the growing chorus of researchers pouring cold water on the now common assumption in the media and general population that contact sports causes CTE, and that CTE causes those with the disease to commit suicide.

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